WJCT News

Embattled Senator Frank Artiles Resigns Over N-Word, Insults

Sen. Frank Artiles, R-Miami, is officially out of the Florida legislature. Artiles has resigned just days after saying that he would not not step down, and announcing plans to run for re-election. He has been under fire for insulting his colleagues during a not-so-private conversation earlier in the week.

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House Cracking Down On Fentanyl, Drug Trafficking

As Florida tackles an uptick in opioid overdoses, state lawmakers passed a measure Thursday that seeks to toughen state drug trafficking laws.

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National News

The Nazi's Neighborhood

7 hours ago
J. Ross Baughman

Was there ever a Nazi neighborhood in Chicago? In this special Curious City presentation inspired by a question from Alix Anne Shaw, we tell the story of how an infamous neo-Nazi group settled in the Marquette Park neighborhood and used it as a home base to gain attention and promote its political agenda. The story of the group’s rise and fall on Chicago’s Southwest Side raises questions about the extent of free speech and how mainstream racism in any neighborhood can encourage hate groups.

How to hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence

7 hours ago
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jiuguangw/8129557462/">Jiuguang Wang</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence — known as SETI — got a boost in 2015, when philanthropist Yuri Milner announced plans to inject up to $100 million into the field over the next decade.

Marine Le Pen's 'Brutal' Upbringing Shaped Her Worldview

Apr 22, 2017

Even if far-right leader Marine Le Pen doesn't make it through the first round of French presidential elections Sunday, there's no doubt she's become a major figure in the French political landscape. In just six years at the helm of the nationalist National Front party, she has changed it from a fringe party into a national political force to be reckoned with.

Teresa Crawford

Chicago-area U.S. Environmental Protection Agency employees are feeling so threatened by potential budget cuts from the Trump administration that they're doing something unfamiliar and uncomfortable: talking with the media. 

And to help them speak effectively, they're taking a storytelling class. 

Boston University researchers will study Aaron Hernandez's brain to determine if the former NFL star suffered from the same degenerative brain disease as Hall of Famer Junior Seau and former Bears defensive back Dave Duerson, who also took their own lives.

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Do you have what it takes to navigate the political swampland of Florida and come out clean?

WLRN and the Miami Herald have partnered to create a  new interactive experience that will allow you to put your political integrity to the test.  After a cutthroat election, you have officially begun your career as a Florida politician.

Now it is up to you to make the right political and personal choices.

Reuters

Demolition continues today on a home in Seffner, near Tampa, where a man was killed when sinkhole opened up under his bedroom. The sad and frightening story of a man swallowed up by the Earth as he slept has most Floridians paying more attention to sinkholes, but they're actually a fairly common occurrence in the state.

    Jacksonville has seen a sharp increase in the number of pedestrian and bicyclist traffic deaths in the past year.    
       Local law and traffic enforcement agencies are teaming to raise awareness of the problem and share how to avoid such accidents.
Sheriff John Rutherford says pedestrian traffic deaths jumped 39-percent in Jacksonville last year. Deaths of bicyclists jumped 80-percent.
       He says the main problem is that people lack awareness of their surroundings.

          A group of downtown Jacksonville business and community leaders are kicking off a project to enhance the north bank and south bank riverwalks on the St. Johns River.
       The Riverwalk Project will present its initiative during next month’s One Spark festival.
          The project will create an app and website that would stream information about health, the environment, arts and entertainment and Jacksonville’s history.



         Jacksonville’s Downtown Investment Authority says it does not think the city should waive a fee on new construction.
         The legislation is to be discussed and possibly voted on next  week in three city council committees.
         The mobility fee is paid by developers and is used to pay for transportation projects. It’s designed to encourage redevelopment close to the city’s core and limit sprawl.

Jacksonville.com

Military flyovers, a favorite moment during Jaguars games, could be a victim of the sequester. USA Today reports that if the budget cuts go into effect, it's possible that the flyovers will end, at least for this fiscal year and possibly beyond.

Florida National Guard

    Governor Rick Scott is slamming President Barack Obama and Congress for not getting a budget deal done to replace the sequester set to begin on Friday.
         Scott says because politicians in Washington aren’t doing their jobs, Floridians may lose theirs.       
        Governor Scott says Sequestration makes no sense because it uses a meat cleaver approach in cutting spending instead of a scalpel.
         He says it will have a dramatic impact on Florida’s military bases and defense industry.

CEO of Shands
Shands Jacksonville

He's the new CEO of Shands Jacksonville, and Russ Armistead has a full plate- dealing with everything from turf battles over trauma care in Northeast Florida to a planned Medicaid expansion in the state that will greatly impact Shands, the "safety-net" hospital for the region.

Richard Masoner

    Whether the city of Jacksonville should freeze a fee for construction projects brought a long debate to the Jacksonville city council meeting last night.

At issue is if the city should place a three year moratorium on it’s mobility fee.

          The mobility fee is placed on new construction projects with the intention to encourage redevelopment and reduce sprawl. The funds are used for transportation enhancements like sidewalks, bike lanes and road expansion.   

WJCT News


 

The Jacksonville City Council has approved the reappointment of UNF Professor Parvez Ahmed to the city’s Human Rights Commission.

He was approved on a 13-6 vote.

Unlike three years ago, when the council discussed his appointment at length, the vote was done quickly.

Only Robin Lumb spoke about the reappointment expressing concerns that the Rules Committee overruled it’s Chair Clay Yarborough who wanted to wait another two weeks before voting.

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