National News

Coverage of the fires raging through California this summer is hard for anyone to watch, but it's especially difficult for the Cates family.

"My wife can't even watch the news — it singes us to the core," says Chris Cates, a retired cardiologist whose family-owned Segassia Vineyard in Napa Valley, Calif., known for its rich cabernet, was ravaged by fires about this time last year.

A former classmate of Christine Blasey Ford tells NPR that she does not know if an alleged sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh took place as she first suggested on social media.

"That it happened or not, I have no idea," Cristina King Miranda told NPR's Nina Totenberg. "I can't say that it did or didn't."

That's different from what Miranda wrote Wednesday in a now-deleted Facebook post that stated definitively, "The incident DID happen, many of us heard about it in school."

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida (ACLU of Florida) has taken a public stance on a number of the constitutional amendments Floridians are supposed to vote on in November.

Updated 11:35 a.m. Sep. 20 with portions of a statement from Ticketmaster in response to the CBC and Toronto Star's reporting.

Copyright 2018 North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC. To see more, visit North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Woman Rides Bicycle To 183.9 MPH — A World Record

6 hours ago

The fastest human to ride a bicycle over open ground is named Denise Mueller-Korenek, who rode a custom bike at an average of 183.932 miles per hour – shattering a world record that had stood since 1995.

Mueller-Korenek, 45, set the record for fastest speed riding in a slipstream, teaming up with Shea Holbrook, a professional race car driver who piloted a dragster that led the cyclist across the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.

What The F? Cathay Pacific Forgets One

8 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Brett Kavanaugh is not the first presidential nominee to have his run to the Supreme Court frozen at the finish line by a woman's accusations.

Throughout this week of turmoil in Washington, the historical backstory has been the 1991 confrontation between Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and a former colleague named Anita Hill.

Women represent 20 percent of Congress members right now, and Republicans and Democrats differ sharply on why that's the case, not to mention how big of a problem that is.

That in and of itself is perhaps unsurprising, especially at a time when the parties are heavily divided on a wide variety of topics. But a new poll shows that men and women within each party — and especially among Republicans — differ heavily on several of these questions.

Sen. Claire McCaskill says she will vote against Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, but the Missouri Democrat, who is facing re-election in November, says it is not because of allegations of sexual misconduct swirling around the nominee.

In a statement posted to Twitter on Wednesday, McCaskill says the allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford — the professor who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when the two were teenagers — are "troubling" and need to be examined.

Kavanaugh says the allegation is false.

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