Bethany Hanson

Bethany Hanson is a WUSF/USF Zimmerman School digital news reporter for spring 2018.

Born in Weymouth, England, she moved to Tampa in 2006 and is currently a junior, working towards a bachelor's degree in mass communication with a concentration in news editorial.

Bethany hopes to become a travel writer, or report on human rights issues.

The Florida Department of Transportation held an industry forum Monday morning to discuss the new bridge that will replace the Howard Frankland.

They invited designers and contractors to learn about construction plans and opportunities, as well as community and environmental impacts.

Keep Pasco Beautiful is holding its annual coastal cleanup event Saturday morning, and anyone interested in helping the environment can join.

Residents of  Tampa’s University Area will have more options for affordable housing in the coming months.

Dozens of new houses will be rented out for $600 to $700 per month. It's part of the University Area Community Development Corporation’s plan to transform the neighborhood sometimes derided as "Suitcase City," because of it's lack of permanent residents. The hope is that the program will increase home ownership rates.

Red tide arrived in Pinellas County over the weekend with numerous reports of dead fish along beaches from Fort DeSoto to Clearwater. 

Anyone interested in moves by the Trump Administration to relax restrictions on offshore drilling can have their voices heard by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As part of a series of listening sessions across the county, NOAA is coming to USF St. Petersburg at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, to talk about the health and status of our coastal waters.

Distracted and speeding drivers seem to be problems in any neighborhood, but in one Lakeland community, it’s threatening local wildlife. In just three weeks, five of Lake Morton’s swans have been killed by vehicles, and residents are searching for an answer.

The Saint Leo University Polling Institute recently released a survey conducted in early August asking for opinions on a wide range of topics regarding the Catholic Church and social issues.

One topic that stood out was how Pope Francis and the Catholic Church has handled cases of sexual abuse.

Pinellas County is in the middle of their first measles outbreak in 20 years, and the number of cases keeps building. Since August 13, there have been seven reported cases in the county, and as of Wednesday, there are nine in the state.

Members of the Hillsborough County School Board voted Friday to add a new tax referendum to November's ballot.

Polk County added a new name to their healthcare provider network this week. A new contract with Impower will bring behavioral and mental health services to uninsured residents through a telehealth program.

On the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting, students across the Tampa Bay area participated in Friday’s National Student Walkout.

With another hurricane season around the corner, there could be some changes to the way school districts and counties receive reimbursement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the cost of storm shelters.

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Police Chief Brian Dugan announced plans Thursday to commemorate Autism Awareness Month. Their new program, "Help Us, Help You" is an online special needs registry for first responders in the city of Tampa.

Buckhorn announced in his State of the City address last year that he wants to make Tampa one of the first cities in America to be designated as autism friendly. This registry is the next step in his initiative.

Faith leaders from across Pinellas and Pasco counties are urging State Attorney Bernie McCabe to stop seeking the death penalty in murder cases.

Among the 46 pastors and priests who signed a letter to McCabe were Bishop Gregory Parkes from the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg and Reverend Russell Meyer, the director of the Florida Council of Churches.

Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco announced the appointment of  appointment of General Counsel Lindsay Moore as their first constitutional policing advisor.