Caitlin Switalski

Caitie Switalski is a rising senior at the University of Florida. She's worked for WFSU-FM in Tallahassee as an intern and reporter. When she's in Gainesville for school, Caitie is an anchor and producer for local Morning Edition content at WUFT-FM, as well as a digital editor for the station's website. 
 
Her favorite stories are politically driven, about how politicians, laws and policies effect local communities. 
 
Once she graduates with a dual degree in Journalism and English, Caitie hopes to make a career continuing to report and produce for NPR stations in the sunshine state. 
 
When she's not following what's happening with changing laws, you can catch Caitie lounging in local coffee shops, at the beach, or watching Love Actually for the hundredth time. 
 

In the middle of a meeting about the 2018 hurricane season, Edward Rappaport’s cell phone went off with the official announcement of subtropical storm Alberto. 

“There are no watches or warnings, at least at this point for the U.S.,” he said. “But there will be some tropical storm watches for Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula,” since subtropical storms have wider wind fields than regular tropical storms. 

In response to a lawsuit filed by the father of a victim of the Parkland school shooting, Broward County’s largest mental health services provider has denied accusations that it mistreated confessed-shooter Nikolas Cruz. 

The words “Russian hacking” were never uttered, but an official from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said Wednesday that the 2016 presidential election played a big role in elevating the importance of cybersecurity for state and national elections. 

South Florida filmmaker Gina Onori has paired up with students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to make a film about their anti-gun violence movement following February’s mass shooting. 

The film, called WE ARE THE CHANGE, follows Stoneman Douglas students before, during, and after the March For Our Lives rally in Washington D.C. two months ago. It even captures the students in legislative meetings.

On May 19, 2017, LaLa Dior arrived home from cosmetology class at the Florida Barber Academy to find her belongings thrown in a bright blue trash bin.

Dior, who was living in a homeless encampment next to Downtown’s Stranahan Park, learned 80 city employees came with a front-end loader and dumpster truck and threw away her belongings, along with those of some 40 to 50 other people.

The ballot in November's election will be historic for a few reasons, mainly because it’s going to be historically long.  

Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission meets once every 20 years. Broward County’s Charter Review Commission, or CRC, meets every 12. Both put out a series of resolutions for voters to decide on.

Broward County’s 911 system was widely criticized after communication failures during the 2017 airport shooting in Fort Lauderdale. Now it's under scrutiny again for similar failures during the Parkland shooting. 

Files show that critical upgrades have been recommended on the system since at least 2016; most were never made.

There was no excitement or celebration when Lori Alhadeff and Ryan Petty filed their candidacy papers Tuesday morning to run for Broward County School Board. 

Instead, the parents were somber as they spoke of their sense of duty to make schools safer nearly three months after a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School left their children dead. Fifteen others were also killed in the shooting Feb. 14. 

Hurricane season is fast approaching, which means summer is nearly here, as well. For South Florida, this signals increased attention on storm forecasts and applying lessons learned when it comes to evacuation and emergency plans, storm shutters and the possibility of losing power during the most sweltering time of the year.

Last year, more than 700,000 homes had their power knocked out as Hurricane Irma arrived in South Florida. It hit the lower Keys as a Category 4 storm but slowed down to a Cat. 1 as it made its way up the Florida peninsula. 

In a memo released to state environmental officials and county health department offices on Thursday, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection issued a clarification of when and how local and state officials should perform tests on local water systems.

Broward College named a new president Wednesday, the seventh in the school’s history.

Gregory Haile was unanimously appointed by a five-member trustee board, which cited Haile's knowledge of the community, previous work with the college and passion for education. He is expected to take over his new role in July. 

Haile was promoted from his current job as the college’s general counsel and vice president for public policy and government affairs, which he has held for the past seven years.

A new Florida law could make it harder for local governments to keep certain parts of the beach open to the public. 

Fort Lauderdale’s New River Inn has worn many hats since it was built in 1905. It started as a railroad hotel in 1905, then it became city offices. In 1977 it became the original site of the Museum of Discovery and Science before it became what it is today, a museum for the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society. 

Juniors and seniors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School marked a high school milestone this weekend: Prom.

Everything for the students' night, like the ballroom at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort, the flowers and the decorations, were provided by local businesses and Stoneman Douglas alumni for free or at cost. 

Mike Sipes Entertainment was one of the companies that reached out to help. The Pompano Beach business donated music and DJ services to the students to show support.

It’s Broward Navy Day’s 28th Fleet Week celebration at Port Everglades. With military ships docking near Fort Lauderdale, people can actually walk on board and tour vessels like the U.S.S. Detroit and U.S.S. Kearsarge. 

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