Caitlin Switalski

Caitie Switalski is a rising senior at the University of Florida. She's worked for WFSU-FM in Tallahassee as an intern and reporter. When she's in Gainesville for school, Caitie is an anchor and producer for local Morning Edition content at WUFT-FM, as well as a digital editor for the station's website. 
 
Her favorite stories are politically driven, about how politicians, laws and policies effect local communities. 
 
Once she graduates with a dual degree in Journalism and English, Caitie hopes to make a career continuing to report and produce for NPR stations in the sunshine state. 
 
When she's not following what's happening with changing laws, you can catch Caitie lounging in local coffee shops, at the beach, or watching Love Actually for the hundredth time. 
 

A program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts called Arts Across America came to Fort Lauderdale Sunday to sponsor master cellist Yo-Yo Ma in a community discussion about the power of art.  

Former City Commissioner Dean Trantalis took office as Fort Lauderdale’s mayor just over one month ago. A lot has happened in his first few weeks leading the city.

 

The Community Foundation of Broward launched a middle school initiative five years ago called ‘School Is Cool.’ It was a pilot program that targeted students who were not involved with clubs and friends or whose  grades had started to slip. Until now, the foundation was only able to use the program with middle schoolers during the summer and after school. 

But now the foundation has made the largest grant in its history, $3 million, to the Broward County School District to address isolation issues before students get to high school. 

Many Parkland students have turned to activism in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in February. Some advocate for gun control, some against it. 

Patrick Petty, older brother of one of the shooting victims,  is one of the students who tried to invite  conservative speaker Charlie Kirk to speak at Stoneman Douglas High. For Petty, Kirk represents a new viewpoint on how to talk about guns at his school.

Since holding two town hall meetings last week, the steering committee in charge of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Victims’ Fund is moving along quickly in the process to get money to people affected by February's mass shooting in Parkland.

But people who still want to give input in how those funds should be dispersed have one more chance to do so at a meeting in Coral Springs on Tuesday.

 

Nikolas Cruz, the confessed shooter in the Parkland school massacre, was back in front of a Broward Circuit Court judge on Wednesday to determine if he can afford his own attorney or if he should keep his current public defender team. 

Where it used to be quiet for the past 15 years or so along Fort Lauderdale’s Sistrunk Boulevard - there’s now a surge of building projects.

Ever since the Parkland school shooting in February, celebrities, residents and organizations have been donating money to the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Victims’ Fund. 

That money is set to be divvied up among victims’ families, but people got the chance to speak their minds about how to split it up at the first of two town halls in Davie on Tuesday afternoon.

The Rev. Arthur “Art” Stejskal, 90, never got to fly during his time in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was a clerk in 1947.

“I was in charge of enlisted men separation, so I had a lot of happy customers,” he said. “I did the discharges ... I always wanted to fly, and being a missionary in Taiwan I never had the opportunity.”

Thursday, more than 1,000 teens attended the 12th annual Teen Political Forum at the Coral Springs Center For The Arts. 

The program is a night for teens to ask local city officials and Broward County School Board members their questions. 

 

Fort Lauderdale’s War Memorial Auditorium, inside Holiday Park, has been hosting gun shows seven times a year for the last 30 years. On Tuesday, the City Commission announced at a conference meeting that it’s looking to end those shows later this year.

 

One of the initiatives to keep the gun violence prevention movement going took shape on Tuesday night when the first "Town Hall For Our Lives," hosted by U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, opened its microphones to the community. 

The city of Weston wants to ban weapons in city buildings and parks. The city of Coral Gables wants to ban the sale of assault-style weapons inside city limits. But as of now, both of those actions would break a state law that establishes that only Tallahassee can regulate firearms in Florida. 

It will be somewhat of a homecoming for Fort Lauderdale's next fire chief.

Rhoda Mae Kerr began her career in fire service in Fort Lauderdale in 1983, and after becoming the first female fire chief of Little Rock, Arkansas, and then again in Austin, Texas, the New Jersey native is ready to come back to where it all began for her. 

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

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