Kate Stein

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read.
 

Global warming is likely contributing to record-breaking heat in South Florida: 2015 and 2017 tied for the hottest year since regional record-keeping began in the 1800s, and temperatures in the early part of 2018 are setting records, too.

Hurricane Irma uprooted homes and lives in the Florida Keys when it tore through the state last September. The storm also wreaked less visible havoc in many of Florida's low-income communities, where people without cars or living paycheck-to-paycheck struggled to buy food and supplies, and experienced extended power outages.

Adrien Stephen has his dream job. He got it when he moved from Haiti to Miami 25 years ago -- but even before that, he knew what he wanted to do.

"When I go on the road, I see those guys in the big trucks. I always wanted to be a driver."

Several South Florida nonprofits are launching five meetings to ensure equality in hurricane recovery efforts, continuing work that began after Hurricane Irma.

Eight Florida kids are suing the state and Gov. Rick Scott over climate change.

They say it's not just inaction. The lawsuit states Florida officials have pursued policies that worsen the threat from greenhouse gas emissions, and violate Floridians' constitutional rights to health, prosperity and happiness.

Miami Beach is re-examining its plans for flooding and sea-level rise.

A team of engineers, analysts and other experts is visiting the city this week to give feedback on sea-level adaptation projects and stormwater management. The team will be evaluating the city's community outreach and communication, as well as its public infrastructure investments and tidal flooding mitigation strategies.

A vote by Miami-Dade commissioners this week is causing concern among Monroe County residents and environmental advocates who say a collaboration between Miami-Dade and Florida Power & Light is developing too quickly.

South Miami-Dade County is a popular destination for cyclists because of its national parks, fruit stands and (by South Florida standards) open roads.

Recent bike-car collisions in the area have prompted a push to educate cyclists and drivers on how to share the roads safely.

It's a good weekend to learn about rivers in South Florida.

An ugly moment at a meeting of Miami's sea-level rise committee last week has prompted controversy over one of its members and a discussion over the committee's mission.

South Florida’s future looks wet, salty and, unless you’re a mermaid, maybe a bit apocalyptic.

An event at Biscayne National Park this weekend celebrates water -- and storytellers who want to make a splash.

As part of its 50th anniversary, the park is hosting a storytelling contest. Before a live audience and a panel of judges, participants will tell short, real-life stories that include water -- sparkling or still, salty or fresh.

The event is open to the public and will take place 7 p.m. Saturday outside the park's Dante Fascell Visitors Center, 9700 SW 328th St. in Homestead.

The blue-green algae blooms that sometimes swallow Florida’s coasts are thick, green, goopy and smell like sewage. But they’re not a problem that’s unique to Florida.

The blooms gained particular notoriety in the Sunshine State during the summer of 2016, when a massive outbreak choked businesses, wildlife and tourism along both of Florida’s coasts and prompted Florida Senate President Joe Negron to champion a plan to build a massive reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee.

In the southern part of the Sunshine State, solar energy is trending.

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