Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office is appealing a circuit court judge’s decision to remove an education amendment from the November ballot. 

In a letter to Florida election officials federal agencies say they’ve not seen any evidence of new or ongoing compromises to Florida’s election system infrastructure.

A long-running lawsuit over whether the state is properly funding its public schools is now before the Florida Supreme Court.  Oral arguments have been scheduled for November 8th.

Florida is among a minority of states that only allow school districts to approve new charter schools. A proposal once slated on the November ballot seeks to change that. But the fate of amendment eight is unclear after a Leon County Circuit judge ruled its ballot summary is vague and misleading. Now the crafter of the plan is pushing back, arguing her referendum has been mischaracterized by opponents of school choice.

Florida’s top leadership offices are up for grabs this year and one of the largest jobs is overseeing the state’s multi-billion dollar agriculture and consumer services industries. There are seven candidates vying to succeed Adam Putnam as Agriculture Commissioner. Five of them recently appeared before several South Florida editorial boards to make their cases to voters. 

A decision on the fate of an education amendment to Florida’s constitution could arrive as soon as Monday.

The League of Women Voters of Florida is hoping to persuade a Leon County Circuit judge today to strip a constitutional amendment proposal off the November ballot. The amendment in question is number eight, which combines several issues into one proposal like term limits for local school board, mandating civics be taught. But  the part the league takes issue with the section that deals with approving new charter schools.

With Florida's 2018 general election just weeks away the race for U.S. Senate election officials are growing concerned about the potential for hacking. The issue is now playing a role in the U.S. Senate race, as Governor Rick Scott and Senator Bill Nelson spar over whether the state's  systems are secure.

Governor Rick Scott his defending is environmental policies amid a Red Tide that’s choking the state’s Southwest coast and resulting in massive fish and marine life kills. 

Some 34,000 Leon County Students headed back to school Monday and with a new school year comes changes, mostly related to school safety.

The Leon County Classroom Teachers Association is backing three people for school board races including two newcombers.

Two candidates are teaming up to unseat the longest-serving members of the Leon County School Board.  In a joint campaign ad, candidates Marcus Nicolas and Darryl Jones say not all students are getting an equal education.

For the first time in Florida A&M University’s 130-year history, a woman will help lead it’s storied marching band. 

Lively Technical Center is out with a new program to bridge the skills gap in the local construction industry. It follows a recent Florida Chamber of Commerce survey showing employers continue to worry about not funding enough skilled workers.

Once upon a time, the Red Wolf roamed the south and eastern United States, from Texas to Pennsylvania. Today, there are fewer than 40 wolves left in the wild. The species is what’s called “functionally extinct”— with most of the remaining 200 or so wolves in captivity. The Trump administration is proposing changes to the Endangered Species Act that conservationists worry, could end what little protection the Red Wolf has left.

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