Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

The League of Women Voters of Florida wants a constitutional amendment it says is misleading removed from the November ballot. The target is Amendment Eight which critics say could lead to the creation of more charter schools.

The League’s Attorney Rom Meyer says the ballot summary of Amendment Eight is vague and doesn’t tell voters the main purpose of the proposal.

Growth, development and infrastructure are rising to the top of the priority list for the candidates who want to represent the Northwest corridor of Leon County. The County's Third District is up for grabs this year. 

Florida’s statewide teacher’s union is once again suing the legislature—this time over a new law that could directly impact its membership. It’s the latest in a line of lawsuits filed over the state’s education policies.

Three Tallahassee-based arts and culture groups are getting closer to securing hundreds of thousands of dollars in local funding. The group doling out the money meets Monday. But there's controversy over whether the organizations that may get the awards are worthy.

Leon, Wakulla and Nassau County teachers are in danger of losing their union representation if membership doesn’t get above 50 percent. Now a statewide teachers union is challenging the new rule in a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Leon County Circuit court.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to keep a decades long legal fight over water use alive is boosting hopes in North Florida. The state and its northern neighbor Georgia have been locked in a three-decade long fight over how much water each should get from a shared system.

A new law aimed at stopping so-called “failure factories” could ensnare two Leon County Schools. But  Superintendent Rocky Hanna says he’s got no intention of handing over control of either Pineview Elementary or Oakridge.

Hanna says he expected for Pineview Elementary School’s grade to be lower this year. The school got a new administrative team in the middle of the school year. The old principal resigned after forging parent surveys. But Hanna didn’t anticipate Pineview would get an “F” grade. It got a “C” last year.

The Florida Department of Education has released its annual report card on schools and the Big Bend is boasting some strong turnarounds.

The people and businesses that depend on the Apalachicola Bay just got a break from the U.S. Supreme Court—keeping a long running lawsuit over water use alive.

Recent polling shows there are four constitutional amendments poised for approval on Florida’s November ballot. Three of those deal exclusively with the issue of taxation. But there’s ongoing concern that determining tax policy through constitutional referendum isn’t in the public’s best interest.

One of Florida’s main labor unions is throwing its support to former Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown: endorsing his Congressional bid. 

Florida’s Ethics Commission says former Tallahassee city manager Rick Fernandez misused his position to get a catering discount from a local restaurant and obtain football tickets from a lobbyist. 

The longest-serving member of the Leon County School Board is facing a challenge from well-known political insider. Leon County’s Darryl Jones is jumping into the race.

Former Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown is looking to unseat incumbent Congressman and former state senator Al Lawson in August’s Democratic Primary. Both men are trying to distance themselves from each other, but they’re both walking a tightrope between being bipartisan and being perceived as “Democrats In Name ONLY” or DINO’s.

Florida’s embattled medical marijuana office continues wading through rulemaking—two years after Florida voters approved the system. But the industry is moving faster than regulators ability to govern it, leading to problems.

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