Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Recent polling shows there are four constitutional amendments poised for approval on Florida’s November ballot. Three of those deal exclusively with the issue of taxation. But there’s ongoing concern that determining tax policy through constitutional referendum isn’t in the public’s best interest.

One of Florida’s main labor unions is throwing its support to former Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown: endorsing his Congressional bid. 

Florida’s Ethics Commission says former Tallahassee city manager Rick Fernandez misused his position to get a catering discount from a local restaurant and obtain football tickets from a lobbyist. 

The longest-serving member of the Leon County School Board is facing a challenge from well-known political insider. Leon County’s Darryl Jones is jumping into the race.

Former Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown is looking to unseat incumbent Congressman and former state senator Al Lawson in August’s Democratic Primary. Both men are trying to distance themselves from each other, but they’re both walking a tightrope between being bipartisan and being perceived as “Democrats In Name ONLY” or DINO’s.

Florida’s embattled medical marijuana office continues wading through rulemaking—two years after Florida voters approved the system. But the industry is moving faster than regulators ability to govern it, leading to problems.

The commission charged with improving school safety is looking into the effectiveness of school resource officers—a school’s main line of defense that critics say failed students at Marjory Stoneman Douglass High School amid a Valentine’s Day shooting. Seventeen students died, more than a dozen others were injured.

The Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce continues examining whether consolidating city and county services would be a good fit for the area. But it’s efforts have drawn pushback from some local officials—city mayor Andrew Gillum and county commissioner Bill Proctor most notably. But what’s the big deal?

The Leon County school district is calling a video circulating on social media of a Chiles High School student, “disgusting” and condemning the post.

Teachers in several states have gone on strike in recent months, protesting for better pay and working conditions. But that’s not the case in Florida, and likely will never be. Still, once upon a time, Florida led the first teacher strike in the United States. 

 

A spokeswoman for Calhoun-Liberty Hospital says its stakeholders will be watching how an embezzlement case against the former CEO plays out. 

Boosted by local enthusiasts, the Tallahassee Soccer Club held it’s unveiling on a bright, Wednesday afternoon at Happy Motoring.

Florida’s largest police union is throwing its support to Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Gwen Graham and Republican contender Adam Putnam. The former Congresswoman and the state Agriculture commissioner are among the slate of statewide office endorsements. 

Leon County Commissioner Bill Proctor is accusing the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce of trying to make a power grab by pushing the consolidation of city and county government. 

The Florida Supreme Court will take up a long running lawsuit over public school funding. The lawsuit began in 2009 and has made its way through the courts, spanned two governors, multiple education commissioners, and three house and senate leaders.

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