Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

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Planned Parenthood Florida is asking a judge to block the state from imposing any penalties on three abortion clinics in Southwest Florida. The group says the state is incorrect in its assertion the clinics performed abortions beyond their licenses.

Florida’s top healthcare official says her agency was right to cite state planned parenthood clinics for violating abortion rules. But Planned Parenthood Florida maintains it did nothing wrong.

Update: Planned Parenthood Florida Statement on AHCA Clinic Inspection Report from Florida Alliance of Planned Parenthood Affiliates Executive Director Laura Goodhue:

Florida’s charter schools are pushing for a dedicated construction funding source. The state now has nearly 700 charters across the state, but  a major charter school proponent says the schools are struggling to sustain themselves.

Former Florida Governor and GOP Presidential candidate Jeb Bush has unveiled an immigration reform plan.  Bush posted details of his proposal to the social media website medium.com, and it features a pathway to citizenship.

A non-partisan organization wants to change the way Florida’s elected officials are chosen. They’re tired of partisanship and say the best way to address it is to make candidates appeal to a broader electorate. That means tapping in to the state’s nearly 2.9 million No Party Affiliated voters, who are largely locked out of state primaries.

Florida Lieutenant Governor Carlos Lopez Cantera is making a bid for a bigger job: representing Florida in the U.S. Senate. Lopez-Cantera has announced he was to succeed current Florida Senator Marco Rubio, who is running for President.

The Florida Supreme Court has thrown out the state’s congressional districts, saying they’re unconstitutional. The Court’s ruling marks the second time the state’s congressional maps have been invalidated.

Governor Rick Scott is dropping his lawsuit against the federal government over funding for hospitals that treat uninsured patients. Scott says it was through his lawsuit the federal government agreed to extend the Low Income Pool—even though the feds are phasing out the program.

Gov. Rick Scott has rejected a request from Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater to consider a search for a new head of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

Scott wants the cabinet to consider changes at the departments of insurance regulation, financial regulation, and revenue. The exchange comes as Democratic lawmakers call for an investigation into the ouster of former FDLE head Gerald Bailey.

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will decide whether same-sex couples nationwide have a right to marry under the Constitution. The decision by the high court to take up the case has supporters and opponents of gay marriage excited.

The Republican Party of Florida has elected a new chair, state Rep. Blaise Ingoglia (R-Spring Hill). That means Governor Rick Scott’s hand-picked chairwoman, Leslie Dougher is out.

Dougher was appointed by Scott in May. She replaced Lenny Curry, who resigned in order to run for Mayor of Jacksonville. Dougher led the party to victory during the recent election cycle—and Republicans won a super-majority in the Florida House, and secured all cabinet positions, including Governor Rick Scott’s re-election. She was campaigning for a two-year term.

The Florida Department of Education has announced plans to review the state’s standardized testing.  The move comes after a year of criticism for testing policies, and continued opposition to new learning standards.

This Spring Florida students will face a new statewide exam that replaces the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. Students will take end-of-course exams in every grade and most subjects.

“I believe you should have accountability," Senate President Andy Gardiner recently told reporters."  I think there should be testing.  I think the jury is still out on overtesting.”

Some school districts have passed resolutions against standardized testing and some parent groups are pushing for the chance to opt their children out of some exams. The department of education says its review of standardized testing is meant to show parents how the tests are used, and to find quote “deregulation opportunities for the school system.”

Florida Department of Education Commissioner Pam Stewart says there are no plans to pause the end-of-course exams or the Florida Standards Assessment, which will start in the Spring.

During his campaign, Governor Rick Scott promised a review on standardized testing.

DOE is accepting applications for its review committee. The department says the committee will have its first meeting in March.

Florida will go to court over President Obama’s recent order granting additional protections to millions of undocumented immigrants.

Florida attorney General Pam Bondi announced Friday the state will join with Texas to sue the Obama Administration over what it describes as an overreach. The move is a response to President Obama’s executive order which allowing millions of undocumented immigrants to remain in the United States without fear of deportation.

In a statement, Bondi says the lawsuit is not about immigration, but about laws.

One of the students shot last week at Florida State University is paralyzed.

Farhan Ahmed was shot three times in front of the Strozier Library last Thursday. He was one of three people injured by a gunman. Ahmed's sister, Farhana Ahmed spoke on behalf of the family in an update on her brother’s condition at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Monday.

"He immediately knew something was wrong because one of the first bullets struck his spine and has left him paralyzed from the waist down. But despite his injuries he’s alive and we’re so grateful he’s here with us," she says.

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