Mary Shedden

Mary Shedden is a reporter at WUSF, as part of the Health News Florida team. Her assignment: distill policy and science so it makes sense on a personal level.

In the past 20 years, she's told the stories of retired pro athletes in chronic pain, children poisoned by toxic toys, and seniors who nearly overdosed on prescription drugs. 

Her work at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun have been honored by professional organizations including the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Press Sports Editors, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

A graduate of the University of Florida's College of Journalism and Communications, Mary has lived in the Tampa Bay area since 1999.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636 on Twitter @MaryShedden or by email

WUSF All Things Considered Host Lisa Peakes has been honored for having the top radio newscast in the southeast United States in 2017.

The internet is talking this week about the death of 80-year-old Kathleen Dehmlow and her obituary in the Redwood Falls Minnesota Gazette, which was written and paid for by the woman’s own children.

In just 100 words, this tribute turned from announcement to anger, as it revealed a 60-year-old infidelity, and adult children who believe “the world is a better place without her.”

Protests are a staple of American democracy, but some journalism experts are worried about a recent story out of New Orleans, where a handful of paid actors attended a city council meeting about a controversial power plant.

Longtime Pinellas County Commissioner John Morroni died Sunday at the age of 63.

The Treasure Island Republican served on the commission since 2000. He also represented Pinellas County in the Florida House of Representatives for eight years, from 1992-2000.

Videos are an effective media known for its power to illicit emotion. And media consumers are learning the hard way that the images don’t have to be real to be convincing.

WUSF’s Robin Sussingham has been honored with a Regional Edward R. Murrow award for Feature Reporting.

At a time when the public’s trust of the media is on the decline, some local and national journalists with potential conflicts of interest are finding themselves in the spotlight.

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg had his marathon chat with members of Congress. And there was a firestorm over local TV stations owned by Sinclair Media all reading the same script about “fake news.”

But lost in all that media news is a significant shift in the local media landscape in Tampa Bay.

Tampa strip club owner and cancer patient Joe Redner can use medical marijuana he grows on his own, a Leon County Circuit judge ruled Wednesday.

Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri on Monday faced critics of an agreement he drafted over the arrest of undocumented immigrants.

The world’s most popular social media network is in big trouble.

In less than two weeks, Facebook has watched its stock drop $90 billion - almost 20 percent of its value. The Federal Trade Commission is investigating the company, and founder Mark Zuckerberg has been summoned by Congress and the British Parliament to answer allegations that Facebook shared user data without permission.

Students at high schools across Tampa Bay are speaking out on the one-month anniversary of the Parkland high school shooting.

The final public hearing of Florida’s Constitution Revision Commission on Tuesday included a new push to let voters decide if Florida should ban assault-style weapons.

The internet is an enormous blessing and curse for the media. It’s provided an immediate, worldwide outlet for news organizations to share their stories.

But, it’s also an unstable business environment where companies are struggling to make money from an audience that wants and expects to get the news for free.

Everyone thinks HIV happens to someone else.

It only infects men who are having sex with men, they say. Or HIV drug users.

And while that still accounts for about half of all people infected, those who are being diagnosed with this serious sexually transmitted disease don’t fall into simple categories. They’re young and old, straight, gay and transgender, of every race.

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