Peter Haden

Reporter/Producer

Peter Haden is an award-winning investigative reporter and photographer currently working with The Center for Investigative Reporting. His stories are featured in media outlets around the world including NPR, CNN en Español, ECTV Ukraine, USA Today, Qatar Gulf Times, and the Malaysia Star.

He holds a Master of Mass Communication degree from Arizona State University's Cronkite School and bachelor's degrees in Geography and International Studies from the University of Iowa.

After growing up on an Iowa sheep farm, Peter has lived and worked in Ukraine, Chile, Mexico, Washington D.C., Georgia, Arizona and Florida.

His current mission is to tell the greatest stories on earth - in three minutes and thirty seconds.

A Palm Beach County organization is gathering aid for Guatemalans in need after the eruption of Guatemala's Fuego Volcano Sunday. 

Photographer Sofia Valiente grew up in Davie, but for the last three years she’s been documenting the history of the Glades region around the southern lip of Lake Okeechobee. Her project is a 2017 Knight Arts Challenge winner.

Valiente recently told WLRN’s Peter Haden how the idea was born when she came across a set of books by Laurence E. Will, the self-proclaimed “Cracker Historian of the Glades.”

Survivors of the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have announced their next push to end gun violence: a cross-country voter drive.

Six tons of South American cocaine destined for the United States arrived Thursday, but not as originally intended.

The drugs were intercepted by the U.S. Coast Guard and offloaded to authorities at Port Everglades.

The cargo came from an ocean away.

The Coast Guard’s Southeast District operates out of Miami, but some of its ships hunt for smugglers in the Eastern Pacific. Such was the case for the USCG Cutter James that rolled into Port Everglades with nearly $180 million of intercepted cocaine.

With hurricane season fast approaching, Florida Power and Light is testing its systems — and more than 3,000 employees — to make sure they can get the lights back on quickly after a storm.

All this week at the Riviera Beach command center, the company is drilling for a hypothetical storm with characteristics similar to Hurricane Wilma, which struck Florida in 2005.

The company said it’s applying lessons learned from Hurricane Irma.

Dozens of people marched through downtown Lake Worth Tuesday evening before holding a rally for International Workers Day.

There were young boys drumming on buckets, and adults carrying banners and chanting.

The group represented a broad network of community, labor and health organizations.

Ubaldo Cruz, of West Palm Beach, served 22 years in the United States Marine Corps. He said he wants to see equal rights for all people.

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter,” said Cruz, quoting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

There will be no harvesting of Goliath Grouper in Florida, for now.

Opera may seem like work for the grand stage.

But at the front of a crowded assembly room in Lake Worth imaginatively costumed performers recently presented an epic tale of striving, loss and the triumph of friendship: The Adventures of Lola & Friends.

Authorities in South Florida have charged more than 60 sober home and drug treatment center operators with health care fraud over the past year and a half.

 

Economic development teams in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties are working together to reel in a whopper: Amazon’s second corporate headquarters.

Peter Haden / WJCT News

Hundreds of people gathered at the Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall in downtown Jacksonville Monday for the city’s Memorial Day Observance ceremony.

Five new names have been added to the wall.

All branches of the United States military were well represented at the ceremony. Current and former members of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and the Coast Guard, their families, and members of the public came to honor Duval County veterans who died in service to their country.

Florida National Guard Adjutant Gen. Michael Calhoun announced those most recently taken:

State of Florida

Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed nearly 50 bills into law this week. One of them lifted decades-old restrictions on doing business with Northern Ireland.

The move has raised the ire of Irish Catholics.

Peter Haden via Twitter / WJCT News

Former Florida Republican Party Chairman Lenny Curry is Jacksonville’s next mayor. He narrowly beat incumbent Democratic Mayor Alvin Brown Tuesday with just over 51 percent of the vote. Curry says the work starts now.

"This is about one Jacksonville, about one people, and about our future. The message that I’ve carried over the course of this campaign comes from deep within me. This is what I believe. This is what we’re going to do. This will be a safe city again!" Just after conceding, Brown told his supporters he won’t stop trying to improve the city.

Larry Baker

The author of a new novel set in the First Coast is speaking at the Jacksonville Public Library on Wednesday.

Larry Baker will be discussing his latest book, “The Education of Nancy Adams.” Adams is a teacher in a Jacksonville high school.

The Jacksonville Public Library’s Olga Bayer says Baker used to live in the area.

“He has several books which he has set in Northeast Florida. In this one, I think he talks about the St. Johns River quite a bit,” Bayer said.

Peter Haden / WJCT News

A new photography exhibit at Jacksonville’s Museum of Contemporary Art focuses on the American South. Southern Exposure: Portraits of a Changing Landscape features the work of seven renowned photographers.

The project looks at the stories the land can tell.

MOCA Jacksonville Assistant Curator Jaime DeSimone says she knew the new show would be about the South.

“It took us awhile to understand and refine what that meant. Eventually we decided to focus only on the land,” DeSimone said. “Most of the photographs that you’re seeing don’t include people.”

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