Renata Sago

Renata joined the WVIK News team in March 2014, as the Amy Helpenstell Foundation Fellow. She anchors during Morning Edition and All Things Consideredproduces features, and reports on everything from same-sex marriage legislation to unemployment in the Quad Cities. 

Renata fell into public radio after spending two years in France and Guadeloupe. She got her start as an intern for Worldview, a global affairs program that airs on WBEZ, Chicago's NPR member station. There, she produced a variety of segments covering politics and culture. She later joined Vocalo as a producer for two weekly programs.

Renata is Chicago native and a graduate of Brown University and Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane. 

Boxes and stacks of wedding RSVPs crowd Kelly Bardier and Jaci Pfeiffer’s dining room in Oviedo, just outside Orlando. The couple is getting ready to tie the knot in Cocoa Beach.

“We have a wedding shower on Sunday and a wedding on October 28, so it’s crazy!” said Pfeiffer.

After they say “I do” they’ll hop on a Disney cruise with their three young boys to celebrate. They’re calling it a “familymoon.”

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When Florida voters go to vote on March 15, the state's voting machines may once again be in the spotlight.

Back in 2000, the nation's most spectacular elections meltdown took place in Florida thanks to the infamous paper butterfly ballots, ancient voting machines and poorly trained poll workers. The ensuing chaos led to a massive recount, a Supreme Court battle and a narrow victory for George W. Bush.

In the Cabinet meeting room of the Florida Capitol building, there are plenty of shaky legs and fidgety hands as the state's clemency board, whose chairman is Gov. Rick Scott, sits down.

Four times a year, ex-felons in Florida petition to get their civil rights restored, including the right to vote.

Among the former felons in the room is Justin (NPR is withholding his last name at his request), who drove seven hours for a five-minute chance to make his case. He waits in the back of the room, clutching an Expando file full of court papers that date back to one mistake.