Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, The Two-Way, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

She holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signed one of the country's most restrictive abortion bills into law on Friday.

The so-called "heartbeat" legislation bans abortions once a fetal heartbeat has been detected, at about six weeks of pregnancy. Exceptions are made in cases of rape, incest or medical emergency.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons said Friday that its team of investigators has finished a fact-finding mission in the Syrian town of Douma, where a suspected chemical weapons attack took place in April.

How much would you pay for a slice of 44-year-old British royal wedding cake?

Five slices of cake from what one auction house calls the "most iconic royal weddings of all times" are going up for sale, going back as far as the 1973 nuptials of Princess Anne and Capt. Mark Phillips.

There's also a slice from the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana and a sliver of fruitcake from the 2011 wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. And there's cake from the nuptials of Prince Charles (again) and Camilla Parker Bowles and of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.

More students walked out of their high schools on Wednesday, but this time they were walking out to support the right to bear arms.

"Stand for the Second" was organized by Will Riley, an 18-year-old high school senior from New Mexico. "It all starts [with] myself and a few of my friends in my living room, making calls," he told NPR.

The walkout comes on the heels of several larger, nationwide demonstrations that saw hundreds of thousands of students and other protesters call for gun control.

Updated at 6:16 p.m. ET

Cambridge Analytica, the firm that used data from millions of Facebook users without their knowledge, said Wednesday that it is "immediately ceasing all operations." The firm worked for President Trump's 2016 campaign.

On Jan. 23, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order that bans U.S. aid to any health organization in another country that provides, advocates or makes referrals for abortions.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET Wednesday

Nearly 4,000 ill-gotten artifacts will be returned to Iraq on Wednesday, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says. The ancient objects were bought by Hobby Lobby, a national chain of arts and crafts stores, then smuggled into the United States in violation of federal law.

Along the fortified border that divides the Korean Peninsula, soldiers in both North and South Korea began dismantling loudspeakers that for decades helped wage a war of words — blaring propaganda over the armistice line.

A passenger from the Southwest Airlines flight on which an engine part exploded has sued the carrier.

Lilia Chavez, a California native, boarded a flight on April 17 at New York's LaGuardia Airport that was bound for Dallas. Twenty minutes later and at an altitude of 32,000 feet, the oxygen masks fell.

Archaeologists discovered the remains of more than 140 children in Peru, children who they believe were sacrificed because of heavy rains.

Their skeletons were found on an excavated site formally known as Huanchaquito-Las Llamas — ground that was controlled by the Chimú Empire some 550 years ago, reported National Geographic in an exclusive published on Thursday.

Four mass graves that concealed thousands of victims of the Rwandan genocide for 24 years have been discovered.

The first bodies were found on Sunday at a depth of 80 feet and the excavation continues, according to The New Times in Rwanda.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

After she found out her husband was having an affair, Jennair Gerardot got on a train from Delaware to Pennsylvania with a wig and extra clothing, broke into the home of the other woman and fatally shot her, authorities said. Then she turned the revolver on herself.

The United Arab Emirates will contribute $50.4 million to rebuild a mosque and cherished leaning minaret that were destroyed after the Iraqi city of Mosul was overrun by the Islamic State.

Serzh Sargsyan, Armenia's former president who lawmakers voted in as prime minister just last Tuesday, announced on Monday that he will step down.

His resignation follows days of heated protests in the streets of Yerevan, Armenia's capital, and large cities across the eastern European nation. Crowds rallied to oppose Sargsyan's new role as prime minister, perceiving it as a maneuver to cling to power.

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