Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Vice President Pence joined a cacophony of voices condemning the imprisonment of two Reuters journalists who were investigating violence in Myanmar.

Wa Lone, 32, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 28, were reporting on the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic minority in the mainly Buddhist country. They were arrested in December, accused of breaking a law on state secrets and sentenced on Monday to seven years in prison. They said they were framed by police officers who had insisted on meeting and then handed them documents minutes before their arrest.

A massive fire that engulfed Brazil's National Museum Sunday night has left staff and officials fearful that many of the nation's most precious artifacts have been lost forever.

The museum housed 20 million items, including objects that tell the story of Brazil's past: the first fossil discovered there, the oldest female skull found in the Americas and the nation's largest meteorite.

First built in 1818 as a residence for Portugal's royal family, the edifice also contained insects, mummies, paintings and dinosaur bones.

The latest burglary at Clean Soles shoe shop in Roanoke, Va., happened around 4:20 a.m. last Saturday.

"It almost looked normal except for some shoes missing off the counter and shelf," Rob Wickham, a 21-year-old employee, told NPR.

The shop, which opened in 2016, lost about eight shoes that were on display — all of them for the right foot.

Editor's Note: This story contains a brief description of sexual abuse.

Three children from El Salvador were sexually abused at shelters in Arizona after they were separated from their families, Salvadoran officials said Thursday.

"They are sexual violations, sexual abuses, that is what this is about," Liduvina Magarin, a deputy foreign relations minister, told journalists, according to The Associated Press.

A man in Oregon says he was fired from a construction job because he did not want to attend weekly Bible study meetings.

Ryan Coleman, 34, filed an $800,000 lawsuit last week against Dahled Up Construction, a company based in Albany, an hour south of Portland.

According to the complaint, he was hired as a painter in October 2017 and discovered on the job that he was required to attend Christian Bible study as part of his employment.

The Food and Drug Administration has stepped into a simmering debate in California as to whether coffee should come with a cancer warning label.

In March, a judge sided with a nonprofit organization called the Council for Education and Research on Toxics that argued that coffee contains high levels of acrylamide, a cancer-causing chemical compound produced as beans roast.

Pope Francis landed in Dublin on Saturday, his visit eclipsed by the latest sex abuse scandal that touched at least a thousand people in Pennsylvania and opened wounds in Ireland.

As he disembarked from the plane, the pope was greeted by Ireland's Deputy Premier and Foreign Affairs Minister Simon Coveney, his wife and their three daughters. One of the girls then presented Pope Francis with a bouquet of flowers.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, the former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was arrested and charged on Friday after he was accused of groping a woman, law enforcement officials said.

Detective Sophia Mason of the New York Police Department told NPR that the public health expert allegedly "grabbed a victim's buttocks without her permission." The incident was said to have happened last October in his home.

It was reported to police in July.

The man who waited outside John Lennon's New York apartment building and then shot him to death in 1980 has been denied parole a 10th time.

Mark David Chapman, 63, stood before a New York State Board of Parole panel on Wednesday. In its decision, which was emailed to NPR, the panel said that releasing him would be "incompatible with the welfare and safety of society."

It also noted that the fact that Chapman has only one crime on his criminal record does not mitigate his actions.

Before the family reunification process began, government officials coerced mothers and fathers who were separated from their children into signing documents that waived their rights — threatening them, deceiving them and even denying them food and water, say immigration groups that filed a complaint with the Department of Homeland Security on Thursday.

ISIS has released a new audio recording that purportedly features its reclusive leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. If confirmed to be his voice, it would be his first recording to emerge in nearly a year.

Mexico's second-largest city has passed a measure to decriminalize sexual relations in public — a tactic meant to shift the attention of police toward serious crime.

In a statement issued last week that begins "We take human rights seriously," the government of Guadalajara said having consensual sexual relations or engaging in acts of a sexual nature in public places, such as in cars or parks, would only be prosecuted if there is a complaint.

Most of the world knows her as a survivor of ISIS brutality, but Nadia Murad, who has tried to loosen shackles of the past, recently announced her plans to be married. Her engagement comes at a time when members of her Yazidi community, an ancient religious minority, face an uncertain future in northern Iraq.

In August 2014, Murad was one of thousands of Yazidis who were captured by ISIS and forced into sexual slavery. Three months later, she escaped through the door that one of her captors left unlocked.

Taiwan lost another ally on Tuesday after El Salvador's president, Salvador Sanchez Ceren, reversed course on his country's diplomatic direction by establishing ties with Beijing. The move isolates the democratic island at a time when China has tried to weaken it on the world stage.

Since the late 1940s, China has regarded Taiwan as a renegade province and has pressured countries and businesses to recognize the self-ruled island not as a sovereign nation but as a Chinese territory.

At a pier in San Diego, researchers on Wednesday recorded the warmest sea surface temperature since record-keeping began there in 1916.

Every day, researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego collect data — by hand — from the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier.

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