Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a congressional correspondent for NPR. He also co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015 to cover the presidential election. He focused on the Republican side of the 2016 race, spending time on the campaign trail with Donald Trump, and also reported on the election's technology and data angles.

Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco, California. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and also has a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET

President Trump is denying reports, from NPR and other news outlets, that in a Thursday meeting at the White House he disparaged African nations as "shithole countries" and questioned why the United States would admit immigrants from them and other nations, like Haiti.

Trump told lawmakers that the U.S. should instead seek out more immigrants from countries like Norway.

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It was just a few months ago that President Trump spoke of his former adviser, Steve Bannon, like this.

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This week, Texas Congressman Al Green stood on the House floor and introduced something that sounded pretty dramatic. It was a pair of articles...

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Updated at 11:56 p.m. ET: NPR has obtained the full memo from a Democratic source. Read it at the bottom of this story.

What, exactly, did the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign agree to in 2015, before any votes had been cast in the Democratic primary?

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President Obama spoke to the press this afternoon at the Pentagon just ahead of his two-week summer break in Martha's Vineyard. NPR's Scott Detrow was listening in, and he joins us now. Hey there, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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The "Never Trump" movement's last stand begins Thursday morning in the basement of the Cleveland Convention Center.

That's where the Republican National Convention's Rules Committee will meet Thursday and Friday to debate and approve the guidelines that will govern how GOP delegates nominate their presidential and vice presidential candidates.

This post was updated at 3:10 PM

Russian hackers have been accessing the Democratic National Committee's computer network for the past year, and have stolen information including opposition research files on presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

According to CrowdStrike, the security firm the DNC called in to deal with the massive data breach, one group of hackers tied to the Russian government has been stealing information from the national party for about a year.

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It is the worst mass shooting in American history. At least 50 people are dead, and 53 more have been sent to area hospitals. Joining us now for the latest on this story is NPR's Scott Detrow. Scott, thanks so much for speaking with us.

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I'm Ari Shapiro, and it's time for All Tech Considered.

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Donald Trump could solidify his position as the Republican Party's all-but-certain nominee with a win in Indiana Tuesday.

Ted Cruz is hoping an endorsement from Indiana Gov. Mike Pence could help him buck recent polls and carry the Hoosier State.

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