Vince Kong

DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR / HOST & PRODUCER "REDUX"

Vince Kong is the Digital Content Editor and host of the WJCT News podcast, Redux.

Vince comes to WJCT in 2016 after working for about a decade in print, including stints in the Midwest, Northwest and Southwest. He relocated to Florida in 2014, serving as an editor for Treasure Coast Newspapers. Before that, he spent roughly seven years as a reporter at the Albuquerque Journal in New Mexico. 

Originally from Chicago, Vince graduated with a bachelor's degree in English/creative writing from the University of Montana. When he’s not inside, sitting in front of multiple computer screens, Vince is enjoying craft beer, throwing Frisbees and attempting to walk his English bulldog, Rufus.

Follow him on Twitter @teamvincek.

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On this episode of Redux, we look at the infrastructure of Jacksonville.

We first hear from Fiorentino Group’s Marty Fiorentino, who was recently in Washington working with Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao on infrastructure spending.

Then, what do if you’re a senior citizen and the only bus stop is across eight lanes of traffic? And once you get to get a stop, depending on where you live, lies another set of obstacles.

One Jacksonville city councilman is hoping to make sure all bus stops — at least according to ridership — are created equal.

Then, we have an update on our continuing coverage of the opioid epidemic. And finally, the renaissance of Historic Springfield continues — one beer at a time. But first, here’s an update about potential budget cuts at Florida State College at Jacksonville.


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Governor Rick Scott is feeling the heat from school boards and superintendents across Florida to veto a massive package of education bills, which center around the issue of school choice. We’ll talk to folks on both sides of the debate. 

And, Duval County Schools has identified an interim superintendent even though it’s current superintendent hasn’t left just yet. We have the latest.

Then, we’ll visit one Jacksonville school teacher who, through sharing her love of reading with her students, is inspiring the next generation of literary artists. Also, a settlement is in sight after years of litigation in a housing discrimination against the city.

And finally, commercial space travel might soon be just an hour away for Jacksonville residents. But first, freshman Congressman John Rutherford is back in the spotlight. Find out why on Redux.

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Earlier this year, Jacksonville unveiled its urban food park concept, prompting the start of yet another food truck debate between these mobile establishments and its brick-and-mortar counterparts.

Also, the Legislative session has ended and the passing of a mammoth education bill might be bad news for some of Duval County's poorest students.

Then, dryer than normal weather is causing drought conditions and, yes, wildfires throughout Northeast Florida. We’ll bring you a story on what you need to do to help stave off a water shortage, and how some folks are banding together on social media to help save their animals as they head for shelter from the West Mims Fire.

But first, a verdict in the trial of Corrine Brown.


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Florida is in the grip of an epidemic.

Deaths from opioid overdose and murders associated with the drugs have increased exponentially in recent years.

Governor Rick Scott has declared the state’s opioid problem a public health emergency. 

On this episode of Redux, we’ll look at what state officials are doing to help lower the body count, as well what’s being done locally to treat addicts and prevent addiction.

Then, we have an update on the "Hemming Park 5," as well as a couple of stories honoring military and police officers killed in the line of duty.

But first, we get you up to speed with the trial of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown.


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On this episode of Redux, two topics that have drifted in and out of headlines consistently in recent years — ride-sharing apps and, of course, pensions — have been settled. We bring you up to date on what local and state politicians have decided.

But while these issues are wrapping up, one major issue is just beginning — the fraud trial of former Congresswoman Corrine Brown.

Then, Duval County Schools is cleaning house and some programs facing the chopping block might surprise you. We’ll also let you know about a program from the school district to help non-educators get certified as teachers. And finally, the use of tobacco has gone down in each age group — that is, except for millennials. Find out why.


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