Jacksonville Public Library

Hachette Book Group

Tuesday on First Coast Connect we spoke with author Sasha Polakow-Suransky on the rise of white nationalism in Europe (01:24).  

Book Club blogger Stacy Goldring and Jenna Hassell with the Jacksonville Public Library talked about the fifth anniversary of the regular segment on First Coast Connect (30:16).         

David Brown, CEO of Web.com and chair of this year’s Heart Walk and Dr. Amy Pollak, cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic, talked about Sunday’s walk in downtown Jacksonville and the changes in guidelines by several medical groups as what blood pressure level should be considered as hypertension (46:00). 


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Lego Robotics, 3-D printing and local films are just a fraction of the events scheduled Saturday at the Jacksonville Public Library downtown.


Tuesday on “First Coast Connect” we spoke with WJCT’s Corporate Secretary Carlos Semidei and local resident Elisha Sosa. Both have relatives and friends in Puerto Rico, which was devastated by Hurricane Maria (01:02).

Local Fraternal Order of Police President Steve Zona joined us to talk about his call for the resignation of two city council members after they had an altercation with police (11:11).       

We heard about this being Banned Book Week in America with First Coast Connect Book Club leader Stacey Goldring and Keli Likins, who is the regional manager of the Jacksonville Public Library (30:33).

Kelly Mannel with Jacksonville’s Image Partners discussed a national conference coming to Jacksonville focusing on mindfulness (42:44).  


eclipse glasses
Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

The Jacksonville Public Library gave out about 5,000 solar eclipse glasses earlier this month, and now it’s asking for them back — as well as any others people might be holding onto — after the August 21 eclipse.

Library spokesman Chris Boivin said the donated glasses will be sent to other countries set to experience a total eclipse much sooner than Florida.

  Today on “First Coast Connect,” we discussed the opening of Jacksonville’s first medical cannabis dispensary with Trulieve spokeswoman Victoria Walker (01:09). Terrell Hogan attorneys Matt Sowell and Fadi Chakour (23:47)  joined us to discuss Medical Malpractice Awareness Month. IKEA spokesman Joseph Roth (35:04) told us how the store opening in Jacksonville this year will use environmentally friendly building techniques, including the installation of solar panels. Finally, recently retired Jacksonville Public Library Director Barbara Gubbin (41:30) talked about her career and future plans. 


Matthew Farina / WJCT News

The Jacksonville Public Library unveiled a piece of art Wednesday from Harlem Renaissance sculptor and Jacksonville native Augusta Savage.

Tuesday on “First Coast Connect” we discussed the proposal by President Donald Trump to eliminate federal funding for libraries, museums and artists with Jacksonville Public Library board member Brenda Simmons Hutchins. April is National Donate Life Month and we spoke about an upcoming encouraging becoming an organ donor with Mayo Clinic Department of Transplantation Dr. Katherine Oshel and David Caples, founder of the Katie Caples Foundation and Katie Ride for Life. ”Jeopardy!” winner Jacksonville University professor Julie Brannon joined the show to talk about her experience and we heard a live in-studio performance by Barbra Streisand tribute artist Sharon Owens.  


Tuesday on “First Coast Connect” we discussed the future of Jacksonville’s waterways with City Council President Lori Boyer and Downtown Investment Authority CEO Aundra Wallace. Interfaith Coalition for Action, Reconciliation & Empowerment co-President Geneva Pittman, former ICARE President Pastor Bruce Havens and Folio Weekly editor Claire Goforth discussed a dispute between the organization and Mayor Lenny Curry, and local authors Brenda Jackson and V. Brooks Dunbar joined the show to talk about Saturday’s Jax Book Fest at the Main Library.   

 

Our weekly Media Roundtable on Friday featured Tessa Duval from the Florida Times-Union, Florida Politics reporter A.G. Gancarski, WJCT Business Analyst John Burr and WJCT reporter Lindsey Kilbride. We also spoke by phone with award winning movie director Mira Nair and CEO of Volunteers in Medicine Mary Pat Corrigan and Lisa Weatherby from Wells Fargo joined us to talk about the Women with Heart fundraising campaign. 

    

Thursday on First Coast Connect, we spoke with local residents Judy Sheklin and Lori Shad who will be attending Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. As part of NPR’s “A Nation Engaged” collaboration with local stations we asked listeners what they want the new president to know about themselves and their community as he takes office. We also spoke with Read 66 spokesman Chris Boivin and Jacksonville Public Library regional manager Keli Mathis about their initiative to get more people to read. Gregory von Hausch, president and CEO of the St. Augustine Film Festival, talked about this weekend’s films and events. 

      

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Classic novels including “Catch-22,” “A Catcher in the Rye,” “To Kill a Mockingbird”’ and the Bible have all faced the wrath of individuals or groups seeking to ban from school and public libraries.

The trend continues today with books like “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

This is Banned Books Week and libraries across the country and in Jacksonville are commemorating books that are regularly challenged.

Medicaid Expansion

A new survey shows where Florida voters stand on the issue of expanding the Medicaid pool to the state’s low-income residents.

The Texas Medical Center’s Health Policy Institute poll finds 68 percent of Florida voters are in favor of Medicaid expansion and 71 percent would vote for a candidate in favor of Medicaid expansion.

We discuss the results with Dr. Arthur (Tim) Garson, director of the TMC Health Policy Institute.

Two Jacksonville Public Library employees are hoping to help blind patrons feel more secure about visiting the building’s restrooms.

Imagine going into a public bathroom, and you don’t know where the soap dispensers or the stalls are. Elisha Zuaro of St. Augustine can identify with that. She’s without sight and has to use her hearing to figure things out.

 

“I try to walk in and listen to see, ‘OK, let me hear where the sink is, where someone’s running water—or I listen for the toilets’ flushing; you know, to kind of orient myself.”

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Some refugees living in Jacksonville were once Lost Boys. That was what aid workers called more than 20,000 boys of minority ethnic groups who fled Sudan during a civil war in the early 80s.

On Monday, one of them could be found at the Jacksonville Public Library, where he’s searching for an education.


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Duval County Public Schools wants your gently used instruments. The district is partnering with the Jacksonville Symphony, Jacksonville Public Education Fund, Jacksonville Public Library and Florida Blue to ensure students in need are able to participate in school music programs.

School Board Chair Ashley Smith Juarez says she herself benefited from playing the alto saxophone in school.

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