JEA

JEA power plant
JEA

JEA recently announced it will close a coal-fired power plant on Jacksonville’s Northside, which came online in the late 1980s. With the complex’s closure, about 200 people will lose their jobs.

The plant’s closure after nearly 30 years of service is not surprising in today’s energy climate. If you’ve been paying attention to the electric power generation business, coal fired power plants are closing all across the country.


JEA power plant
JEA

Jacksonville’s community-owned utility company is shutting down a large coal-fired power plant that’s served the area for 30 years.


A recent study by professors at the University of North Florida say Jacksonville’s water quality ranks poorly among residents.

Monday on “First Coast Connect” we discussed Jacksonville’s drinking water with a study by three University of North Florida professors: assistant professors of economics Russell Triplet and Chiradip Chatterjee, professor of accounting and finance Parvez Ahmed, and JEA director of laboratory compliance Kevin Holbrooks. This is National Kidney Month and we spoke with Dr. Seth Strope, head of the urologic oncology at the Baptist Anderson Cancer Center. New author Tricia Booker talked about her book “The Place of Peace and Crickets” and Cole Pepper talked about his tournament picks for March Madness, the Jaguars aggressive free agent signings and Jacksonville University making the College Invitational Tournament, playing host to St. Francis (Pennsylvania) on Tuesday.   

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

The Jacksonville City Council has passed a law requiring more demographic reporting from city agencies.

It also recommends funding the position of equal opportunity manager to ensure city entities are doing everything they can to broaden their workforces.

Councilman Garrett Dennis, the bill’s sponsor, told his colleagues the law affirms Jacksonville’s commitment to diversity.

City of Jacksonville

The Jacksonville City Council is set to decide Tuesday whether to bolster the city’s program for ensuring workforce diversity at public agencies.

The proposed update to the “Equal Opportunity” program won the approval of two city council committees last week. But that doesn't mean it has a good chance at final passage.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A proposed Jacksonville ordinance aimed at diversifying the city’s workforce Tuesday unanimously passed through its first committee, but not without significant skepticism from some Council members.

Councilman Garrett Dennis filed the bill in response to a continuing federal investigation into alleged workplace discrimination at public utility JEA.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A new partnership between JEA, Florida State College at Jacksonville and Sandalwood High School is promising to prepare more young people for a career in cyber security.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville councilman Garrett Dennis received input from colleagues Tuesday about his proposed ordinance tackling diversity of the city’s workforce.

Much of the discussion hinged upon how the bill should be expanded.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A Jacksonville Human Rights Commissioner is calling the recently filed equal opportunity bill “a good first step,” but the legislation doesn't go nearly far enough to address diversity issues at city agencies.

The bill — filed by Councilman Garrett Dennis — is a response to an ongoing federal investigation into possible racial discrimination at JEA.


A prominent Jacksonville clergyman is a step closer to joining the board of the community-owned utility, JEA.

St. Timothy Baptist Church Pastor Fred Newbill got unanimous approval Wednesday from City Council’s Rules Committee after Mayor Lenny Curry nominated him.  

As leader of a black church, Newbill has been a vocal champion of black civil rights, while at the same time refusing to include gay rights in civil rights.

But JEA policy prohibits discrimination against LGBT people.


JEA

Leaders in Jacksonville’s African-American community are reacting to racially-insensitive emails that were circulated among JEA employees.

The emails came to light at the same time the public utility is being federally investigated for alleged racial discrimination in hiring.


Friday on First Coast Connect, our media roundtable included Sebastian Kitchen from the Florida Times-Union, Timothy Gibbons from the Jacksonville Business Journal, A.G. Gancarski from Florida Politics and WJCT reporter Ryan Benk. Host Melissa Ross spoke by phone with former “A Prairie Home Companion” host Garrison Keillor and former Cummer Museum executive director Hope McMath spoke about Saturday’s commemoration of International Human Rights Day. 

  

Thursday on First Coast Connect, WJCT reporter Ryan Benk discussed his investigative report on emails discovered on servers that violate JEA rules.

Florida author Larry Baker joined us by phone to talk about his the challenge a white male faces in creating compelling minority characters. The 20th edition of “An Evening in December” is set for Friday on Amelia Island. We spoke with Director Pam Helton and Producer Sharon Lennon.  


  

JEA

JEA is launching an internal investigation into inappropriate emails circulated by its employees.

The emails surfaced at the same time the federal government is looking into Jacksonville’s public utility for alleged racial discrimination in its hiring practices.


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