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Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

At least six competing plans ranging from the most restrictive to the most permissive expansions of medical marijuana in Florida are working their way through the state Legislature. And the division is wearing down the patience of state residents, who overwhelmingly supported the measure.


hand lighting marijuana joint
Chuck Grimmett via Flickr

St. Johns County officials want to hear what residents think about potential medical marijuana regulations.

Time is of the essence to pass local rules, with several marijuana bills up for consideration in Tallahassee this legislative session.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville is one step closer to temporarily halting certain kinds of block parties across the city.

City leaders from law enforcement, the parks department and City Council hashed out ways to reform the permitting process Wednesday.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach, is under an ethics investigation for potentially profiting off a budget item he requested for a friend.

The $1 million request for a mental health project was tucked into the budget for Florida State University’s medical school — which is not subject to Governor Rick Scott’s veto pen.

Scott told reporters he’d like to have more oversight on similar spending requests going forward.


Department of Economic Opportunity

The head of Florida’s economic and workforce agency is pushing back against claims business subsidies don’t spur economic development.


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

 

Duval County Public Schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti is a finalist for Detroit Public Schools Community District's superintendent position.

JEA power plant
JEA

Jacksonville’s community-owned utility company is shutting down a large coal-fired power plant that’s served the area for 30 years.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A new commission convened Thursday to begin measuring how well the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office is implementing task force recommendations from last year.

Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams asked the four taskforces to write a strategic plan.

Now, the Commission on Progress will study how well police are doing at increasing transparency, community engagement, training and resources.


phone in hand
Alexandra E Rust via Flickr

The Duval County School District is launching a safety hotline for students and parents. The email and phone system is for reporting threats.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

The nonprofit that manages downtown Jacksonville’s Hemming Park is getting another chance to prove it can handle the responsibility.

Mayor Lenny Curry originally planned for the city to take back control of the park after the Friends of Hemming Park misspent public funds. But Curry last week announced he’d extend Friends’ lease another six months.

Business owners around Hemming want city government to know the park’s condition directly affects their livelihoods.


Flazingo Photos / Flickr

Jacksonville's Navy bases are inviting any military member transitioning out of service, their family members and all veterans to a job fair Wednesday, featuring more than 100 companies.

torange.biz / Creative Commons

After battling for years over how to make healthcare more accessible and affordable, Florida lawmakers landed on a compromise. Instead of expanding Medicaid to cover more people, they decided during last year’s session to attack the cost of care directly, creating a database to make procedure pricing transparent.

Awake the State

Shortly after Governor Rick Scott finished his state of the state address to lawmakers in Tallahassee Tuesday, demonstrations were held in cities across Florida, including one in downtown Jacksonville’s Hemming Park.


Amy Hadden / WJCT News

A Jacksonville afterschool program is going to get new computers and sports equipment, thanks to a $5,000 gift from the Carnival cruise line.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Florida State College at Jacksonville is committing to help pay for school for first-time college students seeking an associate's degree. It’s designed to help lower-income students get an associate’s degree without debt.

The new program is called the FSCJ Promise, which will aid up to 1,000 new students a year. FSCJ will help  fund the first two years of tuition, books and fees for students after federal, state and local aid doesn’t meet their needs.


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