podcast

As politicians and pastors speak out about violent crime in Jacksonville, mourners laid to rest the 13th homicide victim of the year Saturday.

22-month-old Aiden Michael McClendon was shot by a stray bullet January 29 as he sat inside a parked car. Police are investigating the possibly gang-related shooting.

Jacksonville has been Florida’s murder capital on and off for more than a decade now. As Mayor Lenny Curry works to reinvigorate the Jacksonville Journey anti-crime initiative, we examine the city's murder rate and root causes of crime in Jacksonville. Dr. Michael Hallet, professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of North Florida, joins us.


Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry announced in a memo last week that he is changing city employment policy to prohibit discrimination of any kind.

Curry also said that he does not support any further anti-discrimination legislation, including the two competing human rights ordinance bills currently before the Jacksonville City Council. 

One of them, sponsored by Councilman Tommy Hazouri, would prohibit discrimination in housing, employment or public areas based sexual orientation, gender identity or expression by amending the city’s existing HRO.

The other bill before the Council, introduced by Councilman Bill Gulliford would let voters decide on those protections instead of the Council.

In Florida more than a dozen cities have adopted a human rights ordinance that includes non-discrimination protections for the LGBT community. However, Jacksonville remains the largest American city that has yet to do so.

We discuss the latest the two bills before City Council with Florida Politics writer A.G. Gancarski, who has been following the story.


The local activist group Families of Slain Children held a conference Monday about the ongoing issue of gun violence in Jacksonville following the shooting death of a 22-month-old boy on the city's Eastside.

There’s a $20,000 reward for information leading to the arrest in the murder of Aiden Michael McClendon.

We speak with Families of Slain Children founder and CEO Beverly McClain.


We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Paula Horvath, Florida Times-Union columnist; Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include the CBS News investigation into the Wounded Warrior Project's spending, a new proposed constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana in the state, and more.


A new book by a local author and professor looks at the understudied issue of colorism and its impact on young black women.

Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder's "Color Stories: Black Women and Colorism in the 21st Century" examines discrimination within the African-American community based on skin tone. Wilder is an associate professor of sociology and director of the new Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations at the University of North Florida.

We speak with Wilder about the history of colorism and its contemporary significance.


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