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It's that time of year when some gardeners and tomato-coveting shoppers face a vexing question: What on earth am I going to do with all these tomatoes I grew (or bought)?

A select few up to their elbows in tomatoes may have an additional quandary: How am I going to prepare different kinds of tomatoes to honor their unique qualities?

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A First Coast conservationist celebrated the birth of one of the most endangered mammals in the world.

A baby pangolin took its first breaths in St. Augustine last week, thousands of miles away from its natural habitat.


President Obama is off to Alaska today for a three-day trip that is almost entirely focused on climate change. His visit is very much designed to highlight Alaska’s extraordinary scenery and the already-visible effects of climate change there – melting glaciers and permafrost, and rising sea levels.

It will be the first time a sitting U.S. president visits the Alaskan Arctic. Before taking off, Obama announced that he is using his executive powers to rename Mount McKinley – the highest peak in the country – Denali, its traditional Native Alaskan name.

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State regulators Thursday approved a settlement that will clear the way for Florida Power & Light to buy — and ultimately shut down — a coal-fired power plant in Jacksonville.

A three-member panel of the Florida Public Service Commission signed off on the $520.5 million deal, little more than a month after FPL and the state Office of Public Counsel reached a settlement agreement. The Office of Public Counsel is an agency that represents consumers in utility cases.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will be asked next week to set a quota of 320 bears for a controversial hunt in October.

The hunt, the first in the state in more than 20 years, has already attracted 1,795 hunters who have purchased permits, according to the commission.

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