Jax Daily Record

JinkoSolar Inc., suspected since January to be planning a Jacksonville manufacturing plant, is proposing a $50.5 million solar-panel assembly and distribution operation at Cecil Commerce Center, according to City Council legislation posted Thursday.

Kulshrax / Wikimedia Commons

A natural phenomenon that happens twice a year could interrupt the 89.9 WJCT-FM’s programming shortly before 2 p.m. each day  this week.

Dennis Schroeder/Energy.Gov / Via Wikimedia Commons

Legislation has been filed for what appears to be nearly $54 million in public incentives to lure a solar company to Jacksonville.

solar panels
U.S. Navy / Flickr

A solar cooperative that promises to bring the price of panels down 30 percent through bulk-buying has suspended plans to expand in Duval County.

Co-op organizers say a move by JEA to lower residential subsidies for excess solar power makes it economically unfeasible.

Molgreen / Wikimedia Commons

JEA’s sweeping expansion of solar power in Northeast Florida has been mostly praised as a big step into the future and criticism from renewable energy advocates has been more subdued than previous solar proposals.

But some are still concerned about the rollback of a special subsidy paid to rooftop solar users.

Thomas R Machnitzki / Wikimedia Commons

JEA’s governing board Tuesday approved five measures meant to expand the use of solar power in Northeast Florida.


On Tuesday, JEA’s governing board will hold a  workshop and consider five different proposals relating to solar energy, including rekindling a fractious 2016 debate over how much rooftop solar customers can sell their excess power for and increasing its own solar production by 250 megawatts. 


It’s looking more and more like the days of smelly diesel buses in Jacksonville are numbered.

Quillen aboard the Archimedes
Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

A traveling protest against Florida’s solar Amendment 1 launched Tuesday in Jacksonville.  The boat covered in solar panels will stop in high-trafficked areas as it heads south.

Recent polling is good news for advocates of a utility-backed solar amendment on Florida’s ballot in November.

Saint Leo University found an overwhelming percentage of voters support Amendment 1, but that doesn’t mean they understand what it would do.

solar panels on roof
Marufish via Flickr

A solar power amendment Florida voters passed last month will likely cost the city of Jacksonville a hefty chunk of property tax revenue.  

solar panels
U.S. Navy / Flickr

The League of Women Voters of Florida and other organizations launched a campaign Wednesday opposing Amendment 1.

solar panels
U.S. Navy / Flickr

Primary-election voters Tuesday approved the expansion of a renewable-energy tax break that backers say will help businesses and spark the expanded use of solar energy in Florida.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

This article was updated at 2:45 p.m.

With primary early voting underway, WJCT News is taking a close look at what voters are deciding in our series, “What’s On Your Ballot?”

State Constitutional Amendment 4, which would make it cheaper for property owners and businesses to buy and install solar panels, is the first of two opposing solar amendments Floridians will vote on this year.


Jacksonville Electric Authority might revise a proposal to limit the amount it reimburses rooftop solar-panel users for their excess energy.

The municipal utility said Thursday it is considering a 30-percent decrease in reimbursement.