Tech

News about computers, smartphones, gadgets, apps, the Internet and the tech industry.

President Trump is facing a lawsuit for blocking people from his Twitter account.

This week some First Amendment advocates joined the suit — and they are making a novel argument about the right to communicate with the president in the digital age.

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When a website needs to make sure that you are really human, it might use a system known as CAPTCHA.

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This is part of an occasional series: Is My Job Safe? These stories look at jobs that might be at risk because of technology and automation.

Shannon Capone Kirk's first job as a young lawyer in the late '90s was "document review."

It meant "spending weeks upon weeks in either a warehouse or a conference room flipping through bankers boxes and reading paper documents," says Kirk, who now runs the electronic legal research practice, known as e-discovery, at Ropes & Gray in Boston.

The process was time-consuming and expensive.

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Last week in the Russia investigations: Mueller removes all doubt, the imbroglio apparently costs a man a government job and lots of talk — but no silver bullet — on digital interference.


Mueller time

How many more thunderbolts has Zeus in his quiver? Where might the next one strike? Who does the angry lightning-hurler have in his sights — and who will be spared?

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After years of talks and speculation, Sprint and T-Mobile announced Saturday that they have ended discussions about a merger.

In a joint statement, the third- (T-Mobile) and fourth-largest (Sprint) wireless carriers in the U.S. explained that they were unable to agree on the terms of a deal.

President Trump's Twitter account disappeared for a few minutes on Thursday after a departing Twitter employee deactivated it. Mary Louise Kelly speaks to NPR's Laura Sydell about security questions that raises about the president's favorite medium for disseminating information.

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Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

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One year ago, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said it was a “pretty crazy idea” that the social network he created might have influenced the presidential election.

He’s since had a change of heart. And the idea doesn’t seem that crazy, considering the scope of Russian activity online around the election. As the New York Timesreports:

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There appears to be no quick patch for the malware afflicting America's political life.

Over the course of three congressional hearings Tuesday and Wednesday, lawmakers fulminated, Big Tech witnesses were chastened but no decisive action appears to be in store to stop a foreign power from harnessing digital platforms to try to shape the information environment inside the United States.

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