TEDxJacksonville

  Today on “First Coast Connect,” our weekly media roundtable included Florida Times-Union columnist Ron Littlepage, Folio Weekly Editor Claire Goforth and Timothy Gibbons, editor of the Jacksonville Business Journal (01:12). We heard about the upcoming TEDxJacksonville event with director Sabeen Perwaiz and Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, or “Dr. Q,” who will be one of the speakers (35:04). We head a preview of this weekend’s China Cat Sunflower Festival with organizers Christina Parrish and Brenda Walker. Christina’s daughter, Hadley Parrish-Cotton, will perform at the festival and gave us an in-studio musical preview (43:37).   


    

Tuesday on “First Coast Connect” we discussed the future of Jacksonville’s waterways with City Council President Lori Boyer and Downtown Investment Authority CEO Aundra Wallace. Interfaith Coalition for Action, Reconciliation & Empowerment co-President Geneva Pittman, former ICARE President Pastor Bruce Havens and Folio Weekly editor Claire Goforth discussed a dispute between the organization and Mayor Lenny Curry, and local authors Brenda Jackson and V. Brooks Dunbar joined the show to talk about Saturday’s Jax Book Fest at the Main Library.   

 

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As the work week comes to an end, let WJCT's interns Kayla Davis, Blake Allen and Andre Roman be your guides for art, culture and fun on the First Coast.

Media Roundtable

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: 

  • Andrew Pantazi, Florida Times-Union reporter; 
  • Julie Delegal, Folio Weekly writer;
  • Tim Gibbons, Jacksonville Business Journal editor;
  • and Jacksonville blogger Fred Matthews.

Topics include Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign stop in Jacksonville this week, confirmed cases of the Zika virus being transmitted through mosquito bites in Florida, and more.

National Parks

In 2011, Florida Times-Union columnist Mark Woods won the Eugene C. Pulliam Fellowship, a $75,000 award given each year to one American writer.

Woods won the prize with his unique proposal to spend one year in the national parks, which celebrate their centennial this year.

Throughout 2012, he visited one park a month, starting with a sunrise in Acadia National Park in Maine, and ending with a sunset in Haleakala National Park in Hawaii.

Woods shares his experiences in his new book, "Lassoing the Sun: A Year in America's National Parks."

The book not only explores the parks, but also family, the legacies we inherit, and the ones we leave behind.

Mark Woods joins us to discuss the book and the future of the National Park Service.

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