U.S. National Parks

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Wednesday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Jacksonville City Council President Anna Lopez Brosche about her relationship with Mayor Lenny Curry’s administration, the future of JEA and her future political plans (01:18).

 

Monday on First Coast Connect we spoke with Florida Times-Union columnist Mark Woods about President Trump’s announcement he’ll shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments over the objections of five Native-American tribes (01:10).

We talked about the battle against food insecurity in Jacksonville and the new Center for Nutrition and Food Security with Curt Lox, Dean of the Brooks College of Health at the University of North Florida and Dr. Lauri Wright, director of the Doctorate in Clinical Nutrition program (32:36).  

Cole Pepper told about the Jaguars win over Indianapolis and previewed the college football playoff (46:00). 


National Parks Service

The Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve could be a lot more accessible in the years to come.

Flickr/Creative Commons

As the work week comes to an end, let WJCT interns Kayla Davis, Blake Allen and Andre Roman be your guides for art, culture and fun on the First Coast this weekend.

Cincinnati Bengals vs. Jacksonville Jaguars

The Cincinnati Bengals visit the First Coast on Sunday to play the Jacksonville Jaguars in Jacksonville’s final home preseason game. The Jaguars look to provide their fans a home victory before the regular season gets underway. The game begins at 8 p.m. at EverBank Field.

National Parks

In 2011, Florida Times-Union columnist Mark Woods won the Eugene C. Pulliam Fellowship, a $75,000 award given each year to one American writer.

Woods won the prize with his unique proposal to spend one year in the national parks, which celebrate their centennial this year.

Throughout 2012, he visited one park a month, starting with a sunrise in Acadia National Park in Maine, and ending with a sunset in Haleakala National Park in Hawaii.

Woods shares his experiences in his new book, "Lassoing the Sun: A Year in America's National Parks."

The book not only explores the parks, but also family, the legacies we inherit, and the ones we leave behind.

Mark Woods joins us to discuss the book and the future of the National Park Service.

The Florida State Legislature, Jim Overton, and Michael Dunn are in the headlines today.

Thanks to agreements between the Department of the Interior and several states, a dozen popular national parks are open again, at least temporarily. The parks range from the Statue of Liberty to the Grand Canyon; the states are paying to keep them open for up to 10 days.

State officials say it's particularly important to have the parks open during the Columbus Day holiday weekend. National Park Service employees began opening some facilities Friday; others will reopen today or Monday.