water

water flowing  out of tap
next. via flickr

A drier-than-normal winter and spring have Northeast Florida water managers warning of an impending shortage.

But they say the worst can be staved off if people take it upon themselves to cut back their usage.


Serena Summerfield / WJCT News

The St. Johns Water Management District has issued a water shortage warning order for portions North and Central Florida after below-average rainfall this winter.

Abnormally dry weather conditions have prompted the need for additional water conservation in First Coast counties Baker, Putnam, Nassau, Flagler and Clay, which received about half of their normal rainfall.


Coffee-colored water gurgles near the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam. It flows down the Caloosahatchee River, roughly 30 miles from Fort Myers.

Paul Hamilton / Flickr

Jacksonville Beach Public Works officials say it's safe for residents to drink water from the tap. That’s after the utility sent out advisories saying water tested last year had higher-than-normal chemical concentrations of a contaminant.

As the legislative session continues this month in Tallahassee, lawmakers are looking at a number of bills involving the state’s water.

Environmental groups around Florida are criticizing a sweeping water policy bill recently signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott.

We hear how this legislation affects the agriculture industry as we speak with Phil Leary, principal at Leary Governmental Affairs Consultants, who represents the North Florida Growers Exchange.


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Warren Miller

Dave Bruderly wanted to be a Navy officer, like his father. After graduating from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York, Dave saw the world from ships. What he learned inspired him to become an environmental consultant who specializes in oceans.

Bruderly grew up in Ohio and Pennsylvania. He greatly admired his father, who had been a submarine commander in World War II. That’s when he came up with a plan that would shape his life.

Ray Hollister / WJCT News

Tuesday, St. Johns River water managers nearly unanimously approved a controversial plan to handle Central Florida’s looming water shortage.

For years, a consortium of water planners took input from agricultural, residential and conservationist stakeholders to craft what they call a balanced plan.

Northeast Florida river advocates are complaining their data is wrong.


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A water-saving technology company is suing the city of Jacksonville and the Jacksonville Electric Authority for $75 million. The company, Fluid Dynamics, says its reputation was damaged, and it lost business.

A few years back, Fluid Dynamics installed its conservation system called Precision Flow at eight apartment complexes in Jacksonville. Though the city and JEA were aware of the installation, the company alleges Jacksonville suddenly removed its systems in 2012.

On the March 2015 edition of WJCT's Policy Matters, host Rick Mullaney speaks with nationally renowned water resource and marine life experts James G. Workman, writer and Deputy Director of the Environmental Defense Fund's Catch Share Design, and Dr. Quint White, Director of Jacksonville University's Marine Science Research Institute.

You can subscribe to the Policy Matters podcast in iTunes.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Florida's lawsuit seeking to limit the amount of water its neighbor Georgia can take from a shared river system.

The court's decision Monday to hear the case was applauded by Florida officials, and marked a new chapter in the decades-long regional battle over rights to take water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint river system.

Leonard J. DeFrancisci / Wikimedia Commons

Despite a recent case of flesh-eating bacteria in the St. Johns River, the seventh annual State of the River report shows reason for optimism.

Sherry Spearman / WJCT

A water main break in the eastern downtown area of Jacksonville has resulted in poor pressure and outages in the area around EverBank Field.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The funding for two projects designed to improve operations at JAXPORT, including dredging the St. Johns River's shipping channel to accommodate larger ships, will likely be approved by Congress.

Patrick Donges / WJCT

A Jacksonville nonprofit set to start operations by the end of this summer has their sights set on the environmental remediation of Hogan's Creek.

City of Jacksonville

Mayor Alvin Brown has named a group of high-profile business leaders—and one strong environmental voice—to the new task force looking at a proposed deep dredge of the St. Johns River channel.

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