World Relief Jacksonville

Travis Trice (far right), pictured with Elaine Carson (left) and World Relief Jacksonville CEO Jose Vega, compares the refugee vetting process to "torture."
Dima Vitanova / WJCT

Monday on First Coast Connect  we spoke with Travis Trice with World Relief Jacksonville about the work the organization does to help refugees who relocate to the First Coast and some upcoming fundraisers to benefit the group’s efforts (01:09).

Wednesday on “First Coast Connect” we spoke with Florida Times-Union reporter Ben Conarck on State Attorney Melissa Nelson’s decision not to prosecute Jacksonville Sheriff’s Officer Tyler Landreville for the May 2016 shooting death of Vernell Bing Jr. (01:20). We heard about the efforts of World Relief to assist victims of disasters like Hurricane Irma with Senior Vice President of Ministries Emily Gray and Travis Trice of World Relief Jacksonville (33:21) and we spoke with new CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida Sara Alford and Board Chairman Jason Spencer  (43:22).   


World Relief Jacksonville

Jacksonville’s refugee-resettlement organizations are evaluating how this week’s Supreme Court decision enacting some of President Trump’s travel ban will affect their clients.

World Relief Jacksonville officials don’t expect the ruling to affect its work, but that could change.


World Relief Jacksonville

It’s been less than a week since the U.S. State Department quietly alerted refugee resettlement organizations it was lifting a weekly quota of refugees entering the country.

But officials at one local resettlement nonprofit said the move is nothing more than a temporary reprieve.

Joy Kader / WJCT News

Protests at airports around the country occurred this weekend, after President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority countries and suspending all refugee admission for 120 days.

World Relief Jacksonville

A bill to slow the flow of refugees may not have reached the governor's desk, but its impact will still be felt by those looking to resettle in Florida.

Republican Representative Lake Ray’s measure was aimed creating stricter guidelines before allowing Syrian refugees to relocate to Florida.


  Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has joined Gov. Rick Scott and other governors around the country who’ve said they do not want refugees from Syria in their states. In a letter Tuesday, Curry asked Jacksonville’s congressional delegation to stop a plan to accept Syrian refugees.

Jacksonville has the fifth largest Syrian population in America, and one of the largest Arab-American populations overall.

The terrorist attacks in Paris have raised concerns about refugee resettlements from the region. The leaders of World Relief Jacksonville, which works to resettle refugees from all over the world, say those concerns are misplaced.

We speak with Michelle Clowe, Refugee Services Coordinator, Travis Trice, Church Mobilizer, and Katie Sullivan, Volunteer Coordinator with World Relief Jacksonville.

Fonkoze

Zanmi Fonkoze Jacksonville and Riverside Presbyterian Church will host an open meeting Saturday, Oct. 26 to discuss the progress that has been made four years after a devastating earthquake rocked Haiti.

The island nation is still struggling amid humanitarian relief efforts, and Jacksonville has become a hub of activism to raise awareness and provide destitute Haitians with an opportunites.

Long Resettlement Process Awaits Syrian Refugees

Sep 10, 2013
Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
Voice of America / Wikimedia Commons

The United Nations announced the first step towards resettling the victims of the conflict in Syria to other countries. More than 2 million Syrians were forced to leave their homes since 2011, according to the UN.