Alexander Gonzalez

Alexander Gonzalez is a recent graduate of the University of Miami. He majored in English and was the the editor-in-chief of The Miami Hurricane newspaper from 2014-15. He was WLRN's digital intern during summer 2015. He subscribes to too many podcasts and can't get away from covering the arts in Miami.

A 3 p.m. Thursday deadline looms over Palm Beach County, which has experienced issues to finish its recount. Supervisor of Elections Susan Bucher said Wednesday she's entered "prayer mode" to make it on time.

Broward County is expected to start its recount Tuesday in three contested statewide races: U.S. Senate, governor and agriculture commissioner. Florida has until 3 p.m. Thursday to finish counting more than 8 million ballots.

 

Florida is once again counting ballots.

 

The election has lasted three more days in at least three major statewide races: U.S. Senate, governor and agriculture commissioner. They’re likely heading for recounts because of close margins.

Candidates are revving up their campaigning in the final days before Nov. 6.

 

The momentum can be felt in South Florida and across the country. More than 800,000 people have already voted across the region – surpassing those who voted early or by mail four years ago.

WLRN asked listeners about their motivations for going to vote.

Lisa Silvers of Parkland says she’s worried about the country’s direction.

Voters are facing a long ballot this general election – 105 different questions across the region.

 

City of Miami voters will be deciding on a few land-related deals. There’s the fate of David Beckham’s soccer stadium – whether to build the stadium on Miami’s only municipal golf course near the airport.

It’s going to be a marathon for South Florida voters this general election. They’ll run into a long ballot: several candidates for state and local office, a dozen proposed constitutional amendments and all the local referenda.

Broward County is the most cost-burdened area in the country, according to a Harvard study. Residents are paying more than 30 percent of their monthly income on rent alone.

 

In the days leading up to Hurricane Michael’s landfall, Gov. Rick Scott did what any Florida governor would do: warn people. After the storm passed, Scott shifted from warnings to gravitas.

But his appearances were more significant than previous storm responses (Michael is the fourth hurricane Scott has had to respond to in his eight years as governor). 

With elections just under three weeks away in Florida, candidates – especially those for governor and U.S. Senate – know that voters could cast their ballots based on how candidates responded to the storm.

Floridians pay a price for living on the coast.

 

Hurricane Michael, which made landfall just shy of a Category 5 storm, ravaged the Panhandle and Big Bend area. The storm destroyed neighborhoods and washed out roads – changing lives forever.

Developers and investors looking for the next Miami real estate diamond in the rough are venturing into Allapattah, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods bordering trendy Wynwood.

That proximity to the city’s booming urban core, along with Metrorail access and riverfront views, have prompted discussion over the future of development in Allapattah, which some say is at a crossroads.

After almost a year along the beaches on the Gulf Coast, toxic algae has made its way to South Florida.

 

South Floridians complain a lot about traffic. Jammed expressways, reckless drivers and unreliable public transportation contribute to a perennial dissatisfaction about the state of the region’s roadways – which sometimes not even the best Waze-like app can mitigate.

 

The city of Miami could be hiking the price to park for nonresidents.

 

City commissioners are considering increasing the hourly rate to $3.25 an hour in some neighborhoods. Rates would increase for public parking lots, garages and curbside spots.

A year ago, South Florida was bracing for Hurricane Irma.

 

The Category 4 storm made landfall in the Lower Keys. Irma ripped through islands, damaging thousands of homes and businesses. 

A race for a seat on Broward County’s school board lasted a few days beyond the primary election.

 

Over the weekend, there was a recount for the race pitting incumbent Donna Korn against Ryan Petty, whose daughter Alaina was killed in the Feb. 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Politicians and property taxes weren’t the only questions on some ballots this primary season. Voters in the cities of Miami and South Miami approved opening the way for the redevelopment of two high-profile properties.

 

Mobile showers for the homeless in Fort Lauderdale have been shut down for violating city code.

 

According to the Sun Sentinel, the charity Hope South Florida received a notice from the city at the beginning of this month, saying the use of a portable shower outside of a structure is not permitted.

Nine years before director Barry Jenkins became know for his Oscar-winning film “Moonlight” - shot and set in Miami-, he produced his first feature film “Medicine for Melancholy” with an estimated budget of $13,000.

 

Miami nightlife runs on music and DJs are the maestros of that scene. It’s an industry heavily represented by men. But a group of women in a DJ class wants to drop just as many beats.

Two undocumented immigrants who were arrested for driving without a license and face deportation are suing Miami-Dade County over its immigration detention policy. The lawsuit was filed in federal court this week, claiming the county’s policy is unconstitutional.

 

The cost of recycling programs has doubled in some Broward County cities.

 

This month, the price increased when previous contracts with Sun Bergeron expired. Part of that company is now owned by Waste Management, which cities are blaming for the price hike.

For years, the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office had a backlog of rape kits, which contain DNA evidence that could link a suspect to a victim. Some of those kits dated back to the 1980s. In recent years, the agency spent $1 million to test nearly 1,000 kits.

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

None of the more than 1,000 nursing homes and assisted living facilities in South Florida are on Florida Power & Light’s highest priority list for power restoration.

 

FPL rejected Broward and Miami-Dade counties’ lists, which included these facilities, according to the Sun Sentinel.

About two million Venezuelans are fleeing the economic and political crisis in their country and seeking refuge in neighboring countries, including Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.

READ MORE: Escape from Venezuela.

All of Miami will be dropping beats Thursday.

    

The city is marking the longest day of the year – officially the summer solstice – with a lineup of free musical performances. 

Make Music Miami is joining the worldwide celebration Make Music Day, which began in Paris in 1982 as Fête de la Musique. More than 800 cities in 120 countries carry on the spirit of the day – that all musicians can play in public spaces.

The threat of sea-level rise stretches well beyond the coastline.

The lull lasted more than a decade. A major storm hadn’t made landfall in South Florida since the 2004-2005 double-hitter of Hurricanes Wilma and Katrina.

That record ended this past September when Hurricane Irma rocked the region and much of the Caribbean.

The Category 5 storm first made landfall in Barbuda with maximum winds of nearly 180 mph. The hurricane then ripped through St. Martin, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas and Cuba.

Ernesto Rodriguez, spokesperson for Miami Beach Police, says authorities will approach Memorial Day weekend "like a stadium."

Derek Cintron has lived most of his life in Miami Lakes. He says he loved the area so much that he decided to buy a house there five years ago.

Now Cintron is considering a move. He lives 10 minutes away from the site of the future American Dream Miami, the $4 billion retail theme park the county voted Thursday to approve. It would be the largest mall in North America at 6.2 million square feet – big enough to house an artificial ski slope and submarine rides.

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