Brendan Rivers

Reporter

Credit Bonnie Zerr / WJCT

Reporter Brendan Rivers joined WJCT News in August of 2018 after several years as a reporter and then News Director at Southern Stone Communications, which owns and operates six radio stations in the Daytona Beach area.

Originally from Clifton Park, New York, Brendan moved to Florida in high school. He has a bachelor's degree in music from New College of Florida and an associate's degree in music production and technology from Daytona State College.

Brendan originally planned to pursue a career as a composer, arranger, music producer and recording engineer, but an internship at WGCU, the NPR and PBS member station in Fort Myers, convinced him he belongs in broadcasting and public media.

Brendan Rivers can be reached at brivers@wjct.org, 904-358-6396 or on Twitter at @BrendanRivers.

Wetland Preserve
North Florida Land Trust

The Florida Cabinet voted Tuesday to approve a $2.8 million conservation easement on Wetland Preserve in Putnam County.

Climate strikers in front of Jacksonville's City Hall.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

About 100 people gathered at Hemming Park in Downtown Jacksonville Friday to participate in a youth-led climate strike.

The Main Street Bridge in Downtown Jacksonville
Blake Allen

When it comes to clean energy policies, Jacksonville is one of the worst cities in the nation, according to a new report.

The St. Johns River.
Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

A new report points to several worrying trends in the lower St. Johns River basin.

Tidal flooding in downtown St. Augustine on Granada St. near Flagler College.
Bill Bortzfield / WJCT News

When Hurricane Dorian skirted the east coast of Florida earlier this month, there was flooding throughout St. Augustine. 

But the South Davis Shores neighborhood was hit harder than anywhere else in the city.

From left to right: FIU professor Besiki Kutateladze, U.S. District Court Judge Brian Davis, and State Attorney Melissa Nelson.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

State Attorney Melissa Nelson, who represents much of the First Coast, said Tuesday a new report on prosecutorial effectiveness and fairness shows that race and ethnicity were not a significant factor in the cases handled by her office.

The St. Johns River.
The University of North Florida

In a blow to environmental groups, an appeals court Monday overturned a circuit judge’s ruling that said state lawmakers improperly diverted money that flowed from a 2014 constitutional amendment designed to boost land and water conservation.

Hurricane Dorian slows to a crawl over Grand Bahama on September 2, 2019.
NOAA

Hurricane Dorian left at least 20 people dead in the Bahamas before making its way up the east coast of Florida and the U.S.

Scientists have said the catastrophic storm was made worse by rising global temperatures.

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp speaking at a press conference ahead of Hurricane Dorian.
Mary Grace Heath / Office of Georgia Governor Brian P. Kemp

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has expanded the state of emergency to nine more inland counties ahead of Hurricane Dorian.

Florida National Guard soldiers going door to door in the Jacksonville area around Ortega Island following Hurricane Irma, Sept. 11, 2017.
The National Guard / Flickr.com

A photo album of Hurricane Irma could include shots of waves splashing the statue in Riverside’s Memorial Park, homes fully submerged in Black Creek, and the aftermath of flooded homes in San Marco and along the Northside’s Ribault River.

The pier is pictured in the background at St. Augustine Beach.
Michael Rivera / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

St. Johns County emergency officials are asking residents living on barrier islands to be patient as there could likely be bridge closures while Hurricane Dorian makes it way northward.

National Hurricane Center

While the strongest impacts from Hurricane Dorian will be felt along the coast, inland areas won’t be unscathed - especially those that border the St. Johns River.

Chad Gainey takes a break from carving on Wednesday afternoon.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT

In 2017, Hurricane Irma killed a 150-year-old oak tree on Jacksonville University’s campus.

Now that dead trunk has been transformed into a work of art.

Winn-Dixie
DROBER24 / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Justice and Environmental Protection Agency have agreed to a settlement worth about $4.5 million with the Jacksonville-based company that owns Winn-Dixie and Harveys Supermarkets over allegations that the grocery chains violated the Clean Air Act by failing to repair and maintain equipment that was leaking ozone-depleting substances.

Jacksonville City Hall
Brendan Rivers / WJCT NEws

Jacksonville’s state mandated sea level rise task force has wrapped up its work, approving the remaining proposals in a list of recommendations that will eventually go before City Council.

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