Brendan Rivers

Reporter

Credit Bonnie Zerr / WJCT

Reporter Brendan Rivers joined WJCT News in August of 2018 after several years as a reporter and then News Director at Southern Stone Communications, which owns and operates six radio stations in the Daytona Beach area.

Originally from Clifton Park, New York, Brendan moved to Florida in high school. He has a bachelor's degree in music from New College of Florida and an associate's degree in music production and technology from Daytona State College.

Brendan originally planned to pursue a career as a composer, arranger, music producer and recording engineer, but an internship at WGCU, the NPR and PBS member station in Fort Myers, convinced him he belongs in broadcasting and public media.

Brendan Rivers can be reached at brivers@wjct.org, 904-358-6396 or on Twitter at @BrendanRivers.

Congressman John Rutherford
Bruce Lipsky / Florida Times-Union

Northeast Florida Congressman John Rutherford has filed a bill to prevent drilling in federal waters off Florida over the next decade.

Jacksonville's Environmental Quality Division Chief Melissa Long explains the Microbe-Lift study at a testing pond in San Marco.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

Jacksonville is launching a study to see just how effective a bacteria-based technology is at removing nitrogen from water bodies, a leading driver of harmful algal blooms.

City Hall exterior
Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

At its final meeting on Friday, Jacksonville’s Storm Resiliency Committee recommended the city take steps to protect wetlands.

City Councilman Jim Love (a new member of the AAA Working Group) looks at a floodzone map of downtown Jacksonville.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

Jacksonville’s sea level rise work group voted unanimously Friday to expand its boundaries to include areas that have been impacted by flooding in recent hurricanes.

Florida's new Chief Science Officer Tom Frazer.
IFAS News / University of Florida

In a call with reporters from across the state on Friday, Florida Chief Science Officer Tom Frazer said he recognizes Florida’s ongoing struggle with harmful algal blooms and will make water quality issues his priority moving forward.

These proposed additions to the red book would go through the Subdivision Standards and Policy Advisory Committee established via section 654.142 of the city charter.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

Jacksonville’s storm resiliency committee looks poised to recommend several changes to city development rules that members hope will improve drainage and reduce flooding.

Flooding in Jacksonville during Hurricane Irma.
Robert Torbert

After two months of fact finding meetings, Jacksonville’s Adaptation Action Area Working Group is ready to move to the next step.

The first order of business: expanding the group’s area of focus beyond the coastal areas mapped out when it was first established.

Jacksonville City Hall
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

Councilmembers Lori Boyer and Jim Love have filed a bill they hope will better prepare Jacksonville for sea-level rise and flooding.

The Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine.
Castillo de San Marcos National Monument

An international conference on climate change and sea level rise and the threat they pose to historic resources in coastal and river communities is coming to St. Augustine.

Davide Tanasi taking 3D digital images at Tolomato Cemetery in St. Augustine.
Brendan Rivers / WJCT News

In coastal cities like St. Augustine, historic sites are facing modern threats - climate change and sea level rise. Now historians and preservationists are turning to technologies like 3D imaging as they look to protect those cultural resources for future generations.

Jacksonville City Hall
Brendan Rivers / WJCT NEws

Members of a Jacksonville committee looking at infrastructure and resiliency against storms agree they need to bring in a consultant as they look to protect the city.

A basking Florida softshell turtle.
Bill White / NASA

The nonprofit Fish and Wildlife Foundation of Florida has announced they’re awarding a $30,000 grant to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for freshwater turtle disease research to investigate a rash of mysterious deaths.

Welcome to Atlantic Beach sign.
Davide Santoriello / Flickr.com

The City of Atlantic Beach is trying to become Florida’s first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified city under a new U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) pilot program.

Jacksonville City Hall
Steven Martin / Flickr.com

More than two months after its first meeting, members of Jacksonville’s Storm Resiliency and Infrastructure Development Review Committee are beginning to spend less time learning and listening and more time putting together proposals they think will help prepare the city for sea level rise and flooding.

Green algae bloom in Palatka.
Sam Carr

The St. Johns Riverkeeper says multiple blue-green algal blooms have been reported in the Welaka, Satsuma and Palatka areas of Florida.

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