Sam Turken

After living in North Carolina the past four years, Miami native Sam Turken is back in the city he’s always called home.

Sam is a proud Miami Beach Senior High alum and a recent graduate of Duke University where he studied journalism, public policy and history. He caught the public radio bug three years ago when he covered a gun buyback in Miami while on his spring break. Since then, he’s produced audio pieces on race, social justice and public housing. He enjoys using sound to tell rich and intimate stories.

A former managing editor of The Duke Chronicle, Sam has digital experience covering a range of other topics. He’s investigated the absence of female managers in Duke men’s basketball program and reported on enrollment imbalances within public schools in Durham, N.C. He’s also interned with WBUR in Boston and Fusion, written for the Raleigh News & Observer and worked for the Duke Reporters’ Lab.

When Sam isn’t doing journalism things, he enjoys the outdoors. He runs, plays tennis and soccer and spends time around the bay and ocean—something he wasn’t able to do while in college. You may also spot him riding his bike around Miami’s streets.

South Miami-Dade residents will have to wait a little longer for the county to decide how it will improve the South Dade Transitway Corridor.  

David Beckham's five-year effort to bring a Major League Soccer team to Miami cleared a major obstacle on Wednesday after the city commission said voters could decide in a referendum on plans for a new soccer stadium. 

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez and other officials rode an express bus along the South Dade Transitway Corridor on Tuesday morning to test new smart traffic priority signals meant to speed up public and private transit throughout the county. 

Florida recipients of a program that protects hundreds of thousands of immigrants from deportation are in Washington, D.C., this week, calling on Congress to pass a law that will let them remain in the U.S. 

Beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) from Haiti, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Honduras will face deportation in the next two years after the Trump administration's recent decisions to end protections for immigrants from those countries. The program has provided immigrants with temporary lawful status and work authorization. 

Florida governor Rick Scott, who is running for U.S. Senate, said during a campaign rally Friday that the country should be firmer in its relations with Cuba, before acknowledging the existence of climate change. 

This story was updated at 6:15 p.m.

The Coral Springs Police Department said on Thursday that it’s open to joining Broward County’s 911 call system, a decision that would streamline the emergency response process across the county.

The state body investigating the Parkland school shooting met at the BB&T Center for the final of its three-day meetings this month to discuss failures with Broward County’s emergency system during the shooting.

The Miami-Dade County Commission approved on Tuesday a proposal that would extend the county's living wage ordinance to concession workers at Miami International Airport.

Under the new proposal, the workers will join other employees at the airport—like janitors—who already make the county's living wage. 

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida toured the Liberty Square public housing complex with local politicians Friday before meeting with more than a dozen Liberty City activists—some of whom have lost relatives to shootings.

The discussion focused on ways to reduce gun violence and improve housing and other opportunities in the area that has long been a hotbed for violence and poverty. 

Concession and flight catering workers at Miami International Airport protested Tuesday for higher wages. 

Dressed in red t-shirts that read "Fed Up," employees of LSG Sky Chefs said the in-flight food catering company has been underpaying them. They want American Airlines, the largest airline at the airport, to pressure Sky Chefs to raise its employees' wages. 

Dozens of immigration activists rallied outside a Broward immigrant detention facility Thursday against the federal government's policies. 

Chanting "up, up with liberation, down, down with deportation," the protestors called for the abolition of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ICE, and for an end to the detention of undocumented immigrants. Signs and chants targeted private contractors like The Geo Group, which runs goverment detention facilities. 

U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said a detention shelter that's housing migrant children has already reunified some children with their families. But she wants the federal government to do more to expedite the process. 

South Florida beneficiaries of a program that has protected more than 300,000 immigrants are bracing for the division of their families when the protection expires.

And activists say their fears have been heightened after watching the federal government's separation of migrant families who have crossed the Mexico border illegally.

The Trump administration announced last year that it's ending Temporary Protected Status for Hondurans, Haitians, Nicaraguans and Salvadorans. The program has shielded them from deportation. 

Miami mayor Francis Suarez will visit a detention facility in Tornillo, Texas on Thursday to see children who have been separated from their families after crossing the Mexico border illegally. 

The city of Miami launched a partnership on Wednesday with a neighborhood watch social network in order to help police investigate crimes and share safety alerts. 

'Neighbors' by the doorbell security company, Ring, is a free app that allows residents of a neighborhood to collect and share with each other videos and photos of suspicious activity. Thousands of people in Miami already use Ring's security system, according to the company's representatives, and the city's police hope Neighbors will help them solve crimes faster. 

Phillip Gonzalez didn't think he was going to make it in.

He arrived at Manolo's at around 8 a.m. on Saturday—an hour after many others—to watch Argentina's first World Cup match. At first, the Argentinian restaurant on Miami Beach told him it reached capacity and locked him and several others out as the game began. 

But then Manolo's made an exception and let them in. Others weren't so lucky. 

South Florida's unemployment rates dropped more than half a percent in the past year, according to job figures released Friday by the Department of Economic Opportunity, contributing to a shortage of labor and rising wages in some industries.

South Florida residents are more at risk of injury and death from defective airbags than people in other parts of the country, according to federal transportation officials.

Florida also ranks third in unrepaired vehicles with faulty airbags from the Japanese maker Takata, with more than 1.4 million defective airbags still in use. That compounds the fact that the region's climate makes the airbags more unpredictable and dangerous, officials say. 

Supporters of an amendment to phase out greyhound racing in Florida held a meeting in Fort Lauderdale Wednesday night to discuss the state of the sport and to strategize about their campaign. 

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings. 

  

A West Kendall charter school received the Miami-Dade County commission's approval Thursday to expand and increase its enrollment. But the go-ahead came with a caveat to limit bringing more traffic into the area.

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