All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00PM
  • Local Host Cyd Hoskinson

In-depth reporting has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Find out more on the All Things Considered site.

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For nearly four decades, Martha Lou Gadsden served her brand of Southern soul food from a converted gas station in Charleston, S.C. She died last Thursday at the age of 91.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Switching between Swahili and English, Dr. Frank Minja asked the African immigrants on the Zoom call if they had any questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Minja, who is originally from Tanzania, was asked how to get the vaccine, how it works, whether it's safe.

Then one person asked him about a video promoting the conspiracy theory that the vaccine is part of a plot to reduce the Black race.

"That's the realm of nonsense and misinformation," he said.

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Canopies of pink and white flowers are blanketing Washington, D.C., after the city's cherry trees hit full bloom last week.

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The pandemic has canceled a lot of events. In one Tennessee county, it took away a beloved one - a campy agricultural celebration called Mule Day. From member station WPLN, Paige Pfleger reports.

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Earlier today, the pastor led an Easter Day service.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHURCH SERVICE)

CURTIS FARRAR: Good morning, everybody.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Good morning, pastor.

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And finally today, even though this year's Mardi Gras didn't feature the usual crowded musical parade, a new album is bringing the culture and celebration of New Orleans directly to you.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WILDMAN")

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We're often told that in order to grow as a person, we have to learn - learn new ideas, new skills, new strategies. But our next guest thinks that in order to grow, it's important to also put aside a lot of what we've been taught.

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A recent study of mummified parrots found in a high-altitude desert region in South America suggests to researchers that, as far back as some 900 years ago, people went to arduous lengths to transport the prized birds across vast and complex trade routes.

The remains of more than two dozen scarlet macaws and Amazon parrots were found at five different sites in northern Chile's arid Atacama Desert — far from their home in the Amazon rainforest.

So how did they get there?

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Updated April 1, 2021 at 6:30 PM ET

Dozens of states are considering Republican-led bills that advocates say are harmful to transgender people. The recent spate of bills are "really challenging to see," says Dr. Rachel Levine, the nation's newly confirmed assistant secretary for health.

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IKEA, the Swedish retail company, launched its first podcast recently.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODCAST, “THE IKEA AUDIO CATALOG”)

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As March Madness heads into its final days, college athletes are playing on a different kind of court: the Supreme Court. On Wednesday the justices heard arguments in a case testing whether the NCAA's limits on compensation for student athletes violate the nation's antitrust laws.

The players contend that the NCAA is operating a system that is a classic restraint of competition in violation of the federal laws barring price fixing in markets, including the labor market.

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