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Updated at 10:32 a.m. ET

Food prices have jumped the most since 1974, when double-digit inflation became a national concern. But inflation isn't a worry this time as prices for just about everything else are diving.

New inflation numbers out Tuesday from the Labor Department offer a window on how consumers are coping in the COVID-19 era. And the bottom line is that we're snacking more — and paying more for a lot of food — as we shop more at our local grocery stores.

The Trump administration says it will now spend billions of dollars to help states make COVID-19 testing more widely available, a move meant to address months-long complaints about test shortages.

But here's the puzzle: Many labs say they have plenty of tests. So what's the disconnect?

Turns out a "test" is not a single device. COVID-19 testing involves several steps, each one requiring different supplies, and there are shortages of different supplies at different times in different places.

A fear of the unknown. The need to maintain an appropriate distance. An urgent desire to find a cure or vaccine.

They're the hallmarks of the coronavirus pandemic, but they also characterized an earlier epidemic: when paralysis-causing polio ravaged the U.S. in the 1940s and '50s.

Now, the toddlers and preteens of that era are once again part of a high-risk group during a deadly epidemic of a highly infectious disease.

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Coronavirus fatalities in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities account for at least one-third of the deaths in 26 states.

As researchers around the globe race to develop a coronavirus vaccine, U.S. authorities are warning American firms to exercise extreme caution in safeguarding their research against China and others with a track record of stealing cutting-edge medical technology.

Peter Stein is an oyster farmer and owner of Peeko Oysters in Long Island, N.Y., which has supplied such storied New York eateries as Gramercy Tavern and Le Bernardin.

But as the restaurants that make up Peeko's client base closed up shop due to coronavirus, Stein — like many other business owners — was faced with a choice to adapt or perish.

He wondered whether he'd be able to sell enough oysters through door-to-door delivery to get by.

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Patti LuPone has been keeping busy during her lockdown. There was an appearance on Rosie O'Donnell's variety show...

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Over the weekend, hip-hop and R&B lost one of its most influential moguls, Andre Harrell. Memorials poured in over social media from friends and celebrities who worked with Harrell over the years, citing him and Uptown Records, the label he founded in 1986, as one of the most influential forces in the entertainment industry. The label helped create the New Jack Swing sound, blending hip-hop and R&B, launched the careers of Mary J.

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The coronavirus pandemic has brought about so much uncertainty. We're worried about our health, our finances, our future. On Friday, the U.S. unemployment rate rose to nearly 15%, and no one knows where it ends. For NPR's Life Kit, national correspondent Sarah McCammon talked to one woman who's lived through years of economic uncertainty about how to cope.

SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: Elizabeth White never expected to find herself in the midst of a financial crisis. In her 50s.

ELIZABETH WHITE: So I'm someone who was doing really well until I wasn't.

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NPR's education reporter talks about what graduating seniors are going through right now as the colleges are closed due to the pandemic and answers their questions.

NPR's education reporter talks about what graduating seniors are going through right now as the colleges are closed due to the pandemic and answers their questions.

A meat-packing plant in Waterloo, Iowa, where a coronavirus outbreak exploded a few weeks ago, resumed operations on Thursday after a two-week closure.

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So you want to feel more grounded during these uncertain times. Well, how about starting a garden? And before you get your hands dirty, here's a checklist.

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The global race for a coronavirus vaccine is on. And around the world, hopes for a vaccine are high.

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NPR's Michel Martin talks with Jane Oates, a former assistant secretary of labor for employment and training, about navigating the changes in the American workforce.

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