All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00PM
  • Local Host Cyd Hoskinson

In-depth reporting has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Find out more on the All Things Considered site.

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With us now is Ohio Republican Representative Jim Jordan. He's ranking member of the House Oversight Committee.

Welcome back to the program.

JIM JORDAN: Good to be with you today.

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At one time, dogs rescued from dogfighting compounds would be put to death. They'd be deemed too dangerous to live. Then, 12 years ago, a football superstar was caught running a major operation.

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Updated 8:38 p.m. ET

President Trump has ordered that the number of refugees allowed to resettle in the U.S. in the coming year be cut nearly in half to 18,000, down from the administration's previous refugee ceiling of 30,000.

The limit represents the lowest number of refugees seeking protection from violence or political persecution allowed into the country since the modern refugee program was established in 1980.

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Political Washington can be a bit of a bubble. The stories that feel so big and so important don't always get people talking in the rest of the country.

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Today we finally heard from the man who has played a key role in the fight over the whistleblower complaint about President Trump's phone conversation with the president of Ukraine.

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In Oakland, Calif., a site next to a highway underpass is now a gathering place with plazas, fountains and curving lawns. It's called Splash Pad, and it was one of the early examples of urban transformation that made landscape architect Walter Hood famous.

Across the U.S., Walter Hood has reimagined street corners and town squares, many at the heart of underserved neighborhoods.

While Kelly Lytle Hernández was growing up in San Diego near the U.S.-Mexico border in the late 1980s and early '90s, she watched as people from her community, friends and neighbors, disappeared: Black youths disappeared into the prison system; Mexican immigrants disappeared through deportations.

These experiences affected her deeply.

"It was growing up in that environment that forced me to want to understand what was happening to us and why it seemed legitimate," Lytle Hernández tells All Things Considered. "And I wanted to disrupt that legitimacy."

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