2014 ballot

Pam Bondi
State of Florida

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, who was easily re-elected to a second term, is defending her decisions to take free trips to conferences and socialize with attorneys that represent corporations under investigation by other states.

Florida’s 2014 election cycle ended with disappointment for Democrats and many victories for Republicans.

Florida GOP wins include the gubernatorial race, the Cabinet—particularly the Attorney General’s race—and gaining a supermajority in the Florida House after several Democrats lost some seats.

“Well, obviously we got beat,” said Florida Democratic Party Chair Allison Tant. “We got beat across the nation. We got beat in Florida.”

She says the party is now looking to move forward to do better in future races.

Florida voters overwhelmingly said yes to a dedicated funding source for land conservation and no to giving governors more power over the judiciary.  Another high-profile amendment fell just shy of what it needed to bring medical marijuana to Florida.

Nearly half the states have legalized marijuana either for recreational or for medicinal purposes, but Florida isn’t one of them.

Rick Scott for Florida

The results of election 2014 and Jacksonville's pension are making headlines this week.

Rick Scott
The Office of Governor Rick Scott

Florida’s election left two questions: Which Rick Scott will govern over the next four years and who can Democrats turn to in a statewide election after failing with a former Republican?

Two of three proposed constitutional amendments failed on Florida’s November ballot. Now, the incoming Senate leaders are weighing in on all three and their effect on the Legislature.

All three amendments needed 60 percent of the vote to pass, and Amendment 1—which earmarks about $9 billion for conservation efforts—took about 75 percent of the vote.

Florida will now dedicate a third of its revenues from real estate transaction fees for water and land conservation after voters approved Amendment One Tuesday.

The following are live updates from Election Day 2014.

Stay up to date with elections across the country with NPR's live politics blog.

The race between Florida Gov. Rick Scott and his Democratic challenger, Charlie Crist, remains essentially tied as the campaign enters its final day.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Monday showed Crist had 42 percent of the vote to Scott's 41 percent. Libertarian Adrian Wyllie had 7 percent with 9 percent undecided.

A Quinnipiac poll last week showed Crist with a 43-40 lead.

Republican Gov. Rick Scott and Republican-turned-Democrat former Gov. Charlie Crist have each spent tens of millions of dollars on a tight race and turned Sunday to popular party figures to help them in the homestretch.

Vice President Joe Biden appeared with Crist at an event targeting Hispanic voters at Florida International University and then attended a rally at a black church in Fort Lauderdale. At the first stop, he noted the growing influence of Hispanics and said they could be at the point where they decide the outcome of this and every future election.

Erik Hersman / Flickr

The 2014 governor's race and crime in Jacksonville are making headlines this week.

A Quinnipiac University poll shows the race between Democrat Charlie Crist and Republican Gov. Rick Scott is still tight.

One constitutional amendment proposal on the November ballot could affect Florida politics and policies for decades to come, but it hasn’t gotten much attention. Still, Amendment Three  could give a future governor the power to change the balance of the Florida Supreme Court.

Polls show Governor Rick Scott and former Governor Charlie Crist are polarizing. Voters are as likely to dislike the candidates as they are to approve of them.

So both candidates are talking about schools, colleges and scholarships -- to motivate their supporters.

“Education is an issue that is helping to appeal to the base," says Sean Foreman, a Barry University political science professor and chairman of the education committee for the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce.

Pages