Amendment 3

With nearly 90 percent of precincts reporting in the state, Florida voters have decided to legalize medical marijuana and reject a controversial constitutional solar-power amendment backed by private utility companies.

The Pierces at home
Jessica Palombo / WJCT News


solar panels on roof
Marufish via Flickr

A solar power amendment Florida voters passed last month will likely cost the city of Jacksonville a hefty chunk of property tax revenue.  

Florida voters overwhelmingly said yes to a dedicated funding source for land conservation and no to giving governors more power over the judiciary.  Another high-profile amendment fell just shy of what it needed to bring medical marijuana to Florida.

Nearly half the states have legalized marijuana either for recreational or for medicinal purposes, but Florida isn’t one of them.

Rick Scott for Florida

The results of election 2014 and Jacksonville's pension are making headlines this week.

Two of three proposed constitutional amendments failed on Florida’s November ballot. Now, the incoming Senate leaders are weighing in on all three and their effect on the Legislature.

All three amendments needed 60 percent of the vote to pass, and Amendment 1—which earmarks about $9 billion for conservation efforts—took about 75 percent of the vote.

One constitutional amendment proposal on the November ballot could affect Florida politics and policies for decades to come, but it hasn’t gotten much attention. Still, Amendment Three  could give a future governor the power to change the balance of the Florida Supreme Court.