death penalty

John Stephen Dwyer / Wikimedia Commons

The Diocese of St. Augustine is urging prayer ahead of the scheduled Thursday execution of Gary Ray Bowles, who pleaded guilty to the 1994 murder of Jacksonville's Walter Hinton.

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A lawyer for a death row inmate scheduled to be executed next month is accusing Attorney General Pam Bondi of hoodwinking him into agreeing to a delay in a U.S. Supreme Court review.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

In her first public appearance as state attorney Monday, Melissa Nelson reiterated her campaign promise of restoring the public’s confidence in Northeast Florida’s criminal justice system.

Nelson admitted the challenge of changing the office’s culture will be an exacting task, but that she had a specific blueprint to accomplish that goal.

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Brian Turner / Flickr

TALLAHASSEE — In what might have been his last word on the issue as a member of the Florida Supreme Court, Justice James E.C. Perry on Thursday rendered a blistering analysis of the manner in which the death penalty is carried out in Florida.

Andre Roman / WJCT News

More than 50 Jacksonville faith leaders are calling for an end to the death penalty.


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Updated at 7:45 p.m. on Aug. 23

Florida’s 4th Judicial Circuit, which includes Duval County, is among a handful nationwide that sentence the majority of criminals to die. That’s according to a report out Tuesday titled “Too Broken to Fix” from Harvard University researchers.


gavel
Brian Turner / Flickr

The latest hearing for a man accused of raping and killing 8-year-old Cherish Perrywinkle three years ago in Jacksonville was delayed again Monday.

Michael Coghlan / Wikimedia Commons

The death penalty will be the focus of a panel discussion Tuesday night in Jacksonville’s Springfield neighborhood.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida is joining advocacy group Justice-4-Jacksonville to release new recommendations for reforming Duval County’s application of capital punishment.

The groups are hoping to drum up public support for a new taskforce to advise State Attorney Angela Corey.


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ZaldyImg via Flickr

The daughter of one murder victim and the mother of another pleaded with Florida lawmakers last week not to require unanimous jury recommendations before death sentences can be imposed, pointing to their family members' cases as proof that unanimity is a bad idea.

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ZaldyImg via Flickr

A Florida House panel is slated to take up a death-penalty proposal Tuesday, three weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Florida's death-penalty system giving judges, not juries, the power to impose death sentences is unconstitutional.

The 8-1 ruling in the Hurst v. Florida case was centered on what are known as "aggravating" circumstances that must be found before defendants can be sentenced to death. A 2002 U.S. Supreme Court ruling, in a case known as Ring v. Arizona, requires that determination of such aggravating circumstances be made by juries, not judges.

woman with sign that says, "Stop State Killing"
Kurt and Sybilla via Flickr

Florida lawmakers are pledging to remedy the state's death-penalty sentencing structure after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that the state's method of giving judges the power to impose death sentences is unconstitutional.

A raft of death penalty cases across the state of Florida are in limbo after a ruling last week by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court struck down Florida’s death penalty sentencing system, declaring that it violates defendants’ Sixth Amendment Rights to trial by jury. This means delays for the outcome of many cases, including several here in our area.

About 400 people currently sit on Florida’s Death Row, including the man charged with murdering Jacksonville resident Shelby Farah. Two years ago, defendant James Xavier Rhodes offered to plead guilty to the murder in exchange for life in prison without possibility of parole. Shelby’s mother, Darlene Farah, has urged the State Attorney’s Office to take the plea. However, State Attorney Angela Corey still intends to pursue the death penalty for Rhodes.

We discuss the latest in the case with Darlene Farah, and attorney and former prosecutor Dale Carson, co-counsel on the civil suit for the Farah family.

We also look at how the Supreme Court ruling affects the Florida death penalty as a whole with Ben Jones, campaign strategist for the criminal justice reform organization Equal Justice USA.


We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; Larry Hannan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly writer; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include the latest on Jacksonville's human rights ordinance, the start of the state legislative session, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Florida's death penalty.


jury box
John Jackson via Flickr

Hundreds of Florida death penalty sentences are in limbo Tuesday after the U.S. Supreme Court tossed out the way the state sentences people to death.

The ruling could lead state lawmakers to require unanimous juries.


The Florida Supreme Court will decide the fate of a Jacksonville man convicted of murdering two people with a hammer.

The state is challenging a judge’s decision to throw out a jury’s recommendation that Raymond Bright be put to death.


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