energy

Downtown Jacksonville
Bill Bortzfield / WJCT News

The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy released its 2020 Clean Energy Scorecard for 100 U.S. cities Thursday, ranking Jacksonville toward the bottom, at No. 74.

Eagle LNG Partners' Maxville facility west of downtown Jacksonville.
Eagle LNG Partners LLC

Tax incentives for a new natural gas export facility on Jacksonville’s Northside have cleared a legislative hurdle.

Energy Inequality

An estimated 16 million Americans pay more than 10 percent of their total income on utility bills, more than four times higher than the average consumer.

A new report from the energy equity nonprofit Groundswell finds Jacksonville is the U.S. city struggling the most when it comes to the issue of energy inequality.

According to their research, nearly 15 percent of Jacksonville households living below the poverty line pay more than $200 per month for electricity.

Adithya Sambamurthy / Reveal

On this hour of Reveal, we take another look at three of our major investigations that explored energy production in the United States, and we’ll bring you up to date on what’s happened since they originally aired.

 From Washington to North Dakota and Oklahoma, we’ll revisit how fracking has opened new realms of oil and gas production and examine some of the complex consequences of so-called "energy independence."

Chuck Coker / Flickr Creative Commons

Jacksonville is one of the least energy-efficient major cities in the country. That’s according to a scorecard by a Washington D.C.-based nonprofit.

Still, the city scored higher than it did two years ago.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Natural gas took center stage at the Florida Energy Summit in Jacksonville Thursday, sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and hosted by the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce. 

Energy company execs and government officials called the fuel source integral to the state’s energy independence.

But a recent study says Florida and the rest of the country are too reliant on the fuel.


The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked Obama administration rules aimed at limiting the hazardous air pollutants like mercury that emanate from the nation’s power plants, though the ruling’s effect on Jacksonville’s electric utility, JEA, appears to be limited.  At the same time, there are updates to efforts on a solar ballot initiative here in Florida, with four utilities and Florida’s attorney general working to block what they say is a potentially misleading measure. The group behind the initiative, Floridians for Solar Choice, filed legal briefs this week supporting the ballot measure, which it argues will remove barriers limiting ownership models of solar generation. We discuss this latest news affects energy here in Florida with Jay Worley, director of environmental programs at JEA, and Stephen Smith, Executive Director of Souther Alliance for Clean Energy and founding member of Floridians for Solar Choice coalition.


Google Maps

A coal-fired power plant in North Jacksonville is being targeted for closure by Florida Power & Light Company. The utility company is asking the state Public Service Commission for permission to buy the Cedar Bay power plant.

Florida Power & Light Company wants to buy the plant on Eastport Road for more than $500 million by July.

solar exposure map
National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Jacksonville City Councilman and Republican mayoral candidate Bill Bishop was on WJCT's "First Coast Connect" call-in show this week. When a listener asked Bishop why there's not more solar power in Florida, he said a low amount of sunshine is a big factor. But research shows Florida actually has above-average solar potential and production.

JAXPORT

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is inviting energy-industry workers laid off in other places to start new careers in Florida. 

Bloomberg News estimates more than 30,000 oil and gas industry workers have been let go as companies slash budgets amidst declining oil prices. Scott’s administration is posting an open invitation to those workers to come find a job in Florida. The state has created the website Fueling Florida Jobs.com, where job seekers can search openings available through the CareerSource Florida network.

Alexander Vasenin / Wikimedia Commons

I get it. I truly understand and empathize with the uproar and outrage concerning the two teenaged girls who tortured and stomped to death a gopher tortoise on July 16 in Clay County.

Wilson Bilkovich / Flickr

Environmental advocates and energy companies are at odds in a fight over what should be allowed in the waters of the First Coast.

As far as solar energy goes, the Sunshine State is third in the country for potential -- and 18th in actual installation.

A proposal out this week from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by 30 percent over the next 15 years has some companies concerned about the effect the regulations may have on the energy sector.

A Tallahassee lawmaker and a South Florida mayor are planning to ask Florida Gov. Rick Scott to stop the expansion of a Miami nuclear power plant. Scott and his cabinet will hear from Florida Power and Light Tuesday about its plans to add reactors to its Turkey Point plant.

Ingrid Damiani / KBT & Associates

An enormous, 49-year-old, whole building thermostat control panel in the basement of the former Haydon Burns library will be salvaged and displayed by the company that built it.

North Florida Clean Fuels Coalition

Electric cars are no longer a thing of the future. More people are driving plug-in cars, even in Jacksonville.

Troy Cryder / NASA

We’re called the Sunshine State, but does Florida do enough to harness solar energy?

U.S. Department of Defense

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson says he’ll fight any plans to drill for oil and gas off Florida’s Atlantic Coast.

Pixabay

City lawmakers have begun to publicly debate whether the city’s six-cent gas tax should be extended for another 20 years.

As oil production goes, Florida isn't much of a player. The state produced less than 2 million barrels last year, which is how much oil Texas pumps from its wells each day.

That's about to change as the revolution in oil drilling technology comes to Florida.

Jacksonville's strategic location on the nation's coast could be a major draw to several sectors, from energy to shipping.

The Mathews Bridge, food trucks, and public funding for sports stadiums are in the headlines today.

Jacksonville Transportation Authority

The Jacksonville Transportation Authority wants to build the first public compressed natural gas station in Northeast Florida.

U.S. Coast Guard / Wikimedia Commons

In a departure from past responses to violations of the Clean Water Act, Congress is looking to disperse fines from BP in a way that will benefit the economies most affected by the spill.

Keuka Energy

Could a First Coast-based energy firm have the answer to global climate change?

How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

Oct 25, 2013

This story is part of a series on commuting in America.

Imagine a hospital on top of a mountain. How would doctors and patients get in and out? In Portland, Ore., commuters don't have to drive up a twisty, two-lane road to get there. Instead, they glide up 500 feet in the air in a gleaming silver gondola.

Portland's aerial tram connects the south waterfront down near the river to the Oregon Health and Science University on top of Marquam Hill.

For nurse Sara Hone, it has changed her commute. "I love it. I can't imagine a time without it," she says.

Vehicle Expo At UNF Rolls Out Alternative Fuel Options

Oct 24, 2013
Florida Alternative Fuel Vehicle Expo

The Florida Alternative Fuel Vehicle Expo will be at the University North Florida on October 31 to showcase a line of green technologies as part of North Florida Transportation Planning Organization's involvement in the Clean Cities Coalition. Wanda Forrest, transportation planning manager for North Florida TPO, said the expo will feature vehicles that are powered with propane, electricity and natural gas rather than petroleum. "It will be a wonderful opportunity for people to come and get educated on different fuel alternatives," Forrest said. Also attending the event will be several exper

JEA

The head spokesman for Jacksonville’s municipal power authority says that there is room to improve how residents and the city itself use and conserve energy.

“I see room for it, but no I don’t see a lot of that here,” said Bud Para, chief public affairs officer for JEA, referring to the types of comprehensive energy efficiency programs being implemented in cities like Austin, New York City, and Seattle.

light bulb
Kate Ter Haar / Flickr

City officials are refuting some findings of a recently released study of cities across the nation that placed Jacksonville in last place for energy efficiency measures.

The American Council for An Energy-Efficient Economy’s “2013 City Energy Efficiency Scorecard” ranks 34 of the nation’s most populated cities on local policies and programs promoting energy efficiency.

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