heat

Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Hector Cortes, from Puerto Rico, prepares heaving lines on Aug. 29, 2019, at Naval Station Mayport in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard / U.S. Navy

Jacksonville’s Naval Station Mayport is among the many military bases that will have to deal with significantly hotter days, according to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. Mayport has historically seen eight days a year with heat index values over 100 degrees. By 2050, that number is projected to jump to 74 days.

Downtown Jacksonville
Ryan Ketterman / Visit Jacksonville

Gobally, June 2019 was the hottest June on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization believes this past July may have been the hottest month on record

An airman assigned to the 557th Expeditionary RED HORSE drinks water while working on a construction site.
Senior Airman Damon Kasberg / U.S. Air Force

In the days after Hurricane Irma tore up the center of Florida in September 2017, 14 residents at a South Florida nursing home died after the facility lost power to its air-conditioning system.

Allie George / WJCT News

With temperatures in Northeast Florida regularly soaring to the upper nineties during the summer, a blacksmith shop might seem like the last place someone would want to visit.

But that’s precisely what St. Augustine’s Fountain of Youth Archeological Park added to its historical attractions last weekend.

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

It’s hot in Florida. Shocking news, right?

In a state where temperatures can easily top 90 from April to October, how a heat wave is defined may surprise you. Many Floridians are experiencing one this week.

Definition Varies

The National Weather Service defines a heat wave as “a period of abnormally and uncomfortably hot or humid weather typically lasting two or more days." The threshold of temperature — or heat index — varies by region.

Like every other state, Florida has two statues in the U.S. Capitol that honor notable people in the state’s history. Dr. John Gorrie is one of them, because he pioneered a contraption in the mid-1800s that changed our lives: Air conditioning.