Hurricane

FPREN

It’s a menacing storm on satellite, and one many residents of The Bahamas are now scurrying to prepare for.  Floridians, however, can rest easy. 

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

Tropical Storm Erika is following a path that could end Florida’s 10-year run without a hurricane.  State and county emergency-management officials are closely monitoring the storm’s predicted path.

Bob Pickering is a Flagler County emergency management technician. He says Erika’s current path puts her 35 miles off the coast of Cape Canaveral early next week. That could mean a wet, windy Monday and Tuesday for the First Coast.

But everything could change within the next two days.

City of Jacksonville

The latest predictions show Tropical Storm Erika possibly heading toward Florida.

Lots of uncertainty remains about when and where the storm might make landfall, but emergency managers say it’s not too early to make a plan.

Jeff Huffman

Very warm waters and relatively light winds aloft will yield an environment favorable for tropical storm development just offshore of Florida’s Atlantic Coast in the next 48 hours.

Alex Pellom / Duval County Emergency Management

With the 2014 hurricane season just beginning, Jacksonville officials are asking residents to become familiar with the city's new evacuation zones.

Duval County Develops New Hurricane Evacuation Zones

May 23, 2014
Duval County EOC

For the first time since 2005, Jacksonville's emergency planners have revamped evacuation zones for major weather disasters.

Previously, the evacuation and disaster plan was solely based on the threat of hurricanes, which only took wind speed into account, Director of Emergency Preparedness, Steven Woodard said. The maps will now help homeowners prepare for storm surge damage as well.

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean will be at or below normal levels this year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's annual forecast.

The six-month hurricane season begins June 1.

Jeff Huffman

The 2014 Hurricane Season is just two weeks away, and officials continue to remind Floridians to prepare the same no matter the forecast.

A little over a week after a major typhoon devastated parts of the Philippines, there is some reason for hope today.

NPR's Russell Lewis, who has been trying to get to Tacloban all week, points us to the front page of today's The Philippine Star: "Aid Delivery To Leyte, Samar Speeding Up" the main headline reads.

NOAA

Members of Jacksonville’s Filipino community are continuing relief efforts following last week's devastating typhoon with a fundraising event tonight.

It was one week ago today that Typhoon Haiyan swept across the Philippines, flattening buildings and killing more than 3,000 people. Most who survived the storm found themselves without food, water, or shelter.

Rosabel Hill with the organization We Filipino, Inc. says there has been an outpouring of concern by residents of the First Coast.

After Hurricane Sandy, the south shore of Staten Island looked like it had been hit by a tsunami. The storm surge devastated whole neighborhoods suddenly, in a matter of hours. In the year since the storm, some families have been rebuilding their homes and their lives. Others are ready to sell their flood-damaged properties and move on.

Joe Salluzzo lives in a neighborhood called New Dorp Beach, a few blocks from the ocean. He rode out the storm on the second story of his brick bungalow, which he's been repairing himself ever since.

Hurricane Raymond has been upgraded to a Category 3 storm in the Pacific Ocean, as it moves slowly northward toward Mexico's southwest coast. Forecasters at the U.S. National Hurricane Center say it could gain more strength before it begins to weaken Tuesday.

Monday morning, the Hurricane Center said that Raymond had maximum sustained winds of 120 mph, with stronger gusts recorded. The storm is moving northward at a 2 mph pace from its current location about 165 miles west-southwest of Acapulco. It was some 100 miles from the coast.

Karen, once feared to hit the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane, has stalled out and weakened into a tropical depression. The National Weather Service says the storm is "drifting" at 2 mph, moving toward Louisiana's southeastern edge. As of early Sunday morning, it was about 165 miles west-southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River.

National Hurricane Center

Tropical Storm Karen is poised to become the first named storm to hit the U.S, but it looks less likely that it will be a hurricane.

The storm is weakening. As of the 5:00 p.m. update, the National Hurricane Center has canceled the Hurricane Watches associated with the storm.

Experts say people shouldn’t let their guard down. Even as a tropical storm, Karen's effects are expected to be largely the same: Heavy rain with the potential for similar storm surge.

Newly formed Tropical Storm Karen, which could reach hurricane strength by Friday, is expected to make landfall on the U.S. Gulf Coast sometime over the weekend.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the late-season storm formed Thursday morning about 485 miles south of the Mississippi Delta, with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph. It was moving north-northwest at 12 mph, but was expected to speed up.

Forecasters say it will make landfall in the U.S. either Saturday or Sunday.

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