Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center

Today on “First Coast Connect,” we spoke with Operation New Hope president and CEO Kevin Gay (01:03) on U.S. Attorney General Jeff Session’s order for federal prosecutors to get tougher on drug crimes and how it could triggers more people receiving long terms in prison under mandatory minimum guidelines. Then we then spoke with President and CEO of Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center Mike Howland (34:09) about May being Better Speech and Hearing Month. Concert on the Green President Lauren Hoffman (41:52) stopped by to talk about Sunday’s concert with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, and Kerry Speckman (44:20) told us about all the other events this weekend.   


UNF Poll on Pension, HRO

A new poll shows Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has some work to do to build support for the pension tax referendum Duval County voters will decide this summer.

The new poll from UNF's Public Opinion Research Laboratory says 36 percent of local residents support the idea, with 24 percent opposed. Forty percent of respondents said they have no opinion on the matter.

Next week the Jacksonville chapter of the United Nations Association and the Jacksonville University Political Science Society will hold the  "GirlUp: Empowering Women and Girls as the Third United Nations Millennium Goal" discussion about gender equality issues on the First Coast and around the world. We discuss efforts to close the gender gap with Karen Jackson, JU professor of biology, Amy Stalker, sponsor of the GirlUp Club of Fleming Island High School, and her student Rachel Thompson, president of the GirlUp Club.


May Is Better Hearing and Speech Month

May 3, 2013
asha.org

Hearing loss is the most frequently diagnosed birth defect.  According to Cynthia Robinson, Co-Director of the Jacksonville Campus of the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech, 33% of children in Florida do not receive follow-up hearing screenings after initial ones when they're newborns.

"Hearing loss is very devastating educationally," Robinson says.  "The most important thing is to get the community awareness out there that children who are born deaf or hard of hearing can, with modern technology and appropriate intervention, learn to listen and talk like hearing children do."