James Weldon Johnson

The Jaxson: James Weldon Johnson Deserves To Be Celebrated

Aug 8, 2018
The Jaxson

James Weldon Johnson is, without exaggeration, the single most accomplished person ever to come from Jacksonville or Florida.

Lindsey Kilbride

The side of the Man Cave Barbershop building on the corner of A. Philip Randolph Boulevard and Pippin Street is covered with a geometric design of vivid colors, with seven faces painted over it. It’s called the “Locals and Legends” mural and one of two new art pieces in the area.

Florida Memory/Lindsey Kilbride

North Florida Democratic Congressman Al Lawson wants Jacksonville to be nationally recognized as the birthplace of Civil Rights activist and songwriter James Weldon Johnson.

Thursday on “First Coast Connect,” we spoke with former State Senator Tony Hill about an event Friday to honor Jacksonville native and civil rights activist James Weldon Johnson. We also heard about the tragedy of babies being born to opioid addicted mothers and the treatments available, and University of North Florida assistant professor of physics Jack Hewitt told us about NASA’s announcement Wednesday. 


       

Florida Memory

Tuesday marks 115 years since a fire destroyed 146 blocks of Jacksonville. The inferno began at a LaVilla mattress factory on the corner of Beaver and Davis Streets.

The fire not only destroyed the city, but marked a turning point for one of the city’s African-American leaders, James Weldon Johnson.


ASCAP / James Weldon Johnson papers, Manuscript Archives, and Rare Book Library, Robert W. Woodruff, Emory University.

A park is being planned on a historic Jacksonville site with ties to the civil-rights movement.

The Durkeeville Historical Society and city of Jacksonville plan to dedicate the birth site of Jacksonville’s Johnson brothers as the “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” Park.

The park is named after the song written by John Rosamond Johnson and James Weldon Johnson in the late 1800s, which the NAACP calls the “Black National Anthem.”