Jay Solomon

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Thursday on First Coast Connect we spoke Tallahassee Mayor and Democratic candidate for Governor Andrew Gillum (01:17).

Our periodic commentator Jay Solomon spoke about the controversy around removing Confederate monuments on the First Coast (39:57).

We heard about this weekend’s Mandarin Art Festival with Show Manager Krysten Bennett (46:00).

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

Monday on First Coast Connect we spoke with WJCT President and CEO David McGowan (1:10).

Commentator Jay Solomon spoke about the importance of civics education (28:52).  

We heard about the upcoming PBS’s American Experience documentary The Gilded Age with Nell Irving Painter, a Princeton University Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita. (32:28).

Cole Pepper brought us the latest sports news (46:38).        

    

Wednesday on “First Coast Connect” we spoke with University of North Florida President John Delaney. He announced last week he’ll be retiring from his position in May 2018. We also heard about senior care from Penney Farms director of marketing Rebecca Padgett. Commentator Jay Solomon spoke about President Donald Trump calling the media the enemy of the people. Host Melissa Ross spoke with Celtic Woman violinist Tara McNeill and we heard from Zach Rocheleau owner of Genetic Potential Academy. 


Tuesday on First Coast Connect we discussed a controversial proposal to allow new development of 10 houses on Cumberland Island in Georgia. We discussed Charles Seabrook’s non-fiction work“Cumberland Island, Strong Women, Wild Horses” with First Coast Connect Book Club blogger Stacey Goldring and Lisa Williams with the North Florida Sierra Club. We also heard from University of North Florida Coggin College of Business professor Parvez Ahmed about some of President-elect Donald Trump’s controversial cabinet selections. Commentator Jay Solomon remembers covering and meeting the late John Glenn. Solomon was a news director in Ohio when Glenn was in the U.S. Senate. We also met Dr. Tra’Chella Johnson Foy, the first African-American women to be named president of the Duval County Medical Society. 


        

http://doctorqmd.com/dr-q/

During this election season, it can be easy to forget the real people behind the issues. Our occasional commentator Jay Solomon rips a story from the headlines in this edition of With All Due Respect on Wednesday's First Coast Connect.

London Elects Muslim Mayor

Reaction continues to pour in around the world at news that London has elected its first Muslim mayor.

Sadiq Khan, the London-born son of Pakistani immigrants, was elected last week by a wide margin after a campaign that saw his Conservative rival Zac Goldsmith accuse him of having shared platforms with Islamic extremists.

 A major overhaul of Florida’s alimony and custody laws is headed to the governor’s desk.

The controversial measure ends lifetime alimony payments. It would also change the way judges settle child custody cases too, with the premise that children split time equally between both parents.

Opponents say this provision is not focusing on the best interests of the child. Supporters say it’s simply a matter of fairness.

We discuss these changes and their potential effects with Jacksonville family attorney Heather Quick.

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Dan Scanlan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly editor; and John Burr, WJCT news analyst.

Topics include President Barack Obama visiting the First Coast this week, the 2016 presidential race, and more.


Atlantic Beach City Commissioner Maria Mark is currently running for re-election against challenger John Stinson. Mark is best known for leading the effort to pass the first and only inclusive Human Rights Ordinance in Northeast Florida. The city of Atlantic Beach passed an inclusive HRO in August of 2014. We speak with Maria Mark about this and other key issues in her campaign.


The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked Obama administration rules aimed at limiting the hazardous air pollutants like mercury that emanate from the nation’s power plants, though the ruling’s effect on Jacksonville’s electric utility, JEA, appears to be limited.  At the same time, there are updates to efforts on a solar ballot initiative here in Florida, with four utilities and Florida’s attorney general working to block what they say is a potentially misleading measure. The group behind the initiative, Floridians for Solar Choice, filed legal briefs this week supporting the ballot measure, which it argues will remove barriers limiting ownership models of solar generation. We discuss this latest news affects energy here in Florida with Jay Worley, director of environmental programs at JEA, and Stephen Smith, Executive Director of Souther Alliance for Clean Energy and founding member of Floridians for Solar Choice coalition.


Flagler College

February may be the shortest month, but from Groundhog Day to Presidents Day it doesn't lack for special days of recognition. WJCT's occasional commentator Jay Solomon examines one of the observances in this edition of With All Due Respect.

Happy Canned Food Month. Surprised? Were you expecting American Heart Month? Well, it's that too, along with eight other "months" in February. Including, of course, Black History Month.

I've never heard any complaints about Heart Month or even Canned Food Month, so why do I hear negatives about Black History Month?

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Eric Smith, "People and Politics" host; Larry Hannan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Tim Gibbons, Jacksonville Business Journal editor; A.G. Gancarski, Folio Weekly and Florida Politics columnist.

Melissa Ross discusses the week's biggest news with our roundtable of local journalists: John Burr, Jacksonville Business Journal editor; Dan Scanlan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Fred Matthews, Eximaner blogger; A.G. Gancarski, Folio Weekly columnist. Topics include same-sex marriage in Florida, the Jacksonville mayoral race, and Governor Rick Scott's second term.

Jay Solomon / WJCT

What does the worst urban fire in the history of the southeastern U.S. have in common with The Jacksonville Landing? In a word: opportunity. WJCT's occasional commentator Jay Solomon explains in this edition of "With All Due Respect."

Within two weeks of the great fire that gutted 146 blocks of Downtown Jacksonville in 1901, reconstruction was underway. Architects, drawn by the blank canvas the smoldering ashes represented, came to town and created the future.

As the United States reopens diplomatic talks with Cuba, Melissa Ross speaks with Tracey Eaton, journalism professor at Flagler College and former Havana bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, about what possible changes could be coming for Cuban citizens.

We also speak with Raul Espinosa, founder of the Fairness in Procurement Alliance and partner of the Umbrella Initiative at UNF, about a local think tank working to give small and disadvantaged business owners a level playing field when it comes to federal contracts.

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