Melissa Nelson

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

Students in Jacksonville’s Lee High leadership class met with State Attorney Melissa Nelson Tuesday afternoon.

 

The students have already met with Nelson once before and they’ve been meeting with many city leaders about juvenile justice reform for about two years.

 

  Friday on “First Coast Connect” it was our weekly Media Roundtable with Florida Time-Union reporter Andrew Pantazi, WJCT business analyst John Burr and WJCT reporter Ryan Benk. We spoke with Dee Quaranta, president of Northeast Florida Women Veterans and singer-songwriter Kim Paige performed live in our studio.   

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry is asking the city council to approve emergency funding for new gun identification technology.

The Integrated Ballistic Identification System uses a shell casing’s “fingerprint” to track down a shooter faster than ever. The new tech is expected to cost the city $250,000.


Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT News

Northeast Florida State Attorney Melissa Nelson announced Tuesday her office is creating a new division to go after human traffickers on the First Coast.

“Because these crimes intersect with almost all different areas of the criminal justice system including drug trafficking, sexual assault and others,” Nelson said. “And because these crimes affect some of the most vulnerable in our community, adding these dedicated resources is a way that we can help those preyed upon to end this vicious cycle.”

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

In her first public appearance as state attorney Monday, Melissa Nelson reiterated her campaign promise of restoring the public’s confidence in Northeast Florida’s criminal justice system.

Nelson admitted the challenge of changing the office’s culture will be an exacting task, but that she had a specific blueprint to accomplish that goal.

Kevin Meerschaert / WJCT

State attorney-elect Melissa Nelson said Monday the office needs to collaborate with the community to ensure laws are enforced in a fair and equitable manner.

State attorney-elect Melissa Nelson ousted incumbent Angela Corey in a landslide last month. On Monday she joined Melissa Ross to talk about the transition and what we can expect from her office when she takes over in January. We also heard from Dr. Nima Aghaebrahim from Baptist Health about recent progress in the treatment of aneurysms. Jon Heymann, CEO of the Jacksonville Children’s Commission, talked about programs available to local youth and the Timucuan Parks Foundation told us about a fundraiser to mark the centennial of the National Parks Service. 


Cyd Hoskinson / WJCT News

In a monumental legal shakeup for the First Coast, the 4th Judicial Circuit will have a new state attorney and public defender.

University of North Florida

Less than a week out from Florida’s primary elections, a new University of North Florida poll is spelling trouble for two Northeast Florida incumbents.

State Attorney Angela Corey is 30 points behind challenger Melissa Nelson.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A forum for 4th Circuit State Attorney candidates in Jacksonville kicked off with a familiar tone Wednesday night.

Hopefuls Wes White and Melissa Nelson criticized incumbent Angela Corey on issues like juvenile justice and court diversion programs. And Corey shot back by excoriating the press and defending her long record.

Jacksonville Bar Association

The candidates vying to unseat State Attorney Angela Corey will share a stage with her this evening at the second candidate forum in as many days.  

Last night’s forum focused on the relationship between police, prosecutors and Jacksonville’s black community.


Jacksonville Sheriff's Office

A new poll of likely voters shows competitive races in two Northeast Florida contests, those for state attorney and public defender.

Incumbents Angela Corey and Matt Shirk are struggling against challengers.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

 

Jacksonville civil rights leaders are demanding a write-in state attorney candidate withdraw from the race. Jacksonville Attorney Kenny Leigh filed to run, closing the primary to only Republican voters.

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