Pension

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

After it passed the Jacksonville City Council unanimously, Mayor Lenny Curry signed into law Tuesday the biggest policy priority of his administration: pension reform.


City of Jacksonville

The Jacksonville City Council passed Mayor Lenny Curry’s pension-reform plan Monday.

Though some members admit it isn't a silver bullet for all of the city’s funding problems, all agree it is the best plan they’ve seen because it includes a dedicated funding source — a half-cent sales tax that will cover pension costs after it was set to end in 2030.

In Curry’s closing remarks at the special council meeting, he issued a warning.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville City Council members got their first look at Mayor Lenny Curry’s pension reform plan Thursday.

Curry’s been tight-lipped about just how his half-cent sales tax and other reform measures would save the city money.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Negotiations over how to reform Jacksonville’s public employee retirement plans continued Wednesday.


Wikimedia Commons

A national financial watchdog group finds Jacksonville taxpayers would have to fork over more than $6,000 each to fully pay off the city’s debt.

Chicago-based Truth In Accounting is calling on city officials to be more transparent with their finances.


Ryan Benk / WJCT News

A month after Jacksonville voters passed a sales-tax extension to cover $2.85 billion in pension costs, city-employee unions are negotiating the terms of closing pension plans to new members.

Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Duval County voters delivered Mayor Lenny Curry a decisive victory Tuesday on one of his biggest priorities: extending a half-penny sales tax to help pay down pension debt.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry says he’s confident voters this month will approve his plan to deal with the city’s $2.7 billion pension debt.

The Republican mayor is pushing back against a contingent of Democratic opposition against the extension of a 1/2-cent sales tax.


Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Note: For Information about Duval County Referendum 1 on the November  ballot, go here. To read about the referendum that passed on the August ballot, continue reading. 

ballot language
News4Jax

A group opposed to Mayor Lenny Curry's plan to use a half-cent sales tax to pay down the city's pension deficit has filed a lawsuit against the amendment.

City of Jacksonville employees and their union leaders are endorsing the pension-tax referendum on this month’s ballot.

Beaches Residents React to Pension Proposal

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry says "we're all in this together" regarding the city's pension obligations, but some residents of the Beaches are skeptical.

Curry has been traveling around Duval County drumming up support for his proposed solution to Jacksonville’s massive unfunded pension liability.

But he’s facing a tough sell in Jacksonville, Atlantic and Neptune Beaches, where some residents are pushing back against the idea of extending a half-cent sales tax.

'Just Vote No'

A new lawsuit has been filed that seeks to knock that half-cent sales tax proposal for Jacksonville off the ballot in the upcoming August 30 primary election.

The lawsuit says the ballot language is too confusing and misleading, even illegal.

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry is leading the charge to get Duval County residents to vote “yes” on the measure to pay down the city’s massive pension debt. The mayor’s office says the referendum’s language meets all the requirements of state law.

Jessica Palombo / WJCT News

Updated at 2:20 p.m.:   

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry unveiled an austere city budget Monday that “reflects the constraints that we face due to increasing pension costs.”

Many services are remaining at minimum levels, while nearly a third of the whole budget is going toward pension costs.


Curry
Pam Hinds / Facebook

A new University of North Florida poll of likely Duval County voters shows support for a pension tax plan is not universal.

Mayor Lenny Curry’s priority tax extension has support from just  41 percent of respondents.

Lori Boyer

Two-term Jacksonville City Council member Lori Boyer takes the reins this month as that body’s new president, promising to push an ambitious agenda for the city.

Boyer’s tenure comes amid big financial challenges for Jacksonville, as well as growing concerns about public safety and tensions between the black community and police.

Lori Boyer joins us to discuss her priorities for the next year.

Media Roundtable Week In Review

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; Larry Hannan, Florida Times-Union reporter; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; and WJCT News analyst John Burr.

Topics include Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry's warning of a property tax increase if voters don't approve his sales tax referendum to help pay off the city's pension obligations, Governor Rick Scott calling on President Barack Obama to fund preventative measures against the Zika virus in Florid, and more.


On the May 2016 edition of Policy Matters, host Rick Mullaney speaks with Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry and current City Council President Greg Anderson about the city's upcoming pension referendum.

You can subscribe to the Policy Matters podcast in iTunes.

UNF Poll on Pension, HRO

A new poll shows Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has some work to do to build support for the pension tax referendum Duval County voters will decide this summer.

The new poll from UNF's Public Opinion Research Laboratory says 36 percent of local residents support the idea, with 24 percent opposed. Forty percent of respondents said they have no opinion on the matter.

News4Jax

 

Mayor Lenny Curry on Thursday ordered the city to stop paying retired Jacksonville Police and Fire Pension Fund Executive Director John Keane a controversial pension created for him and two other pension fund employees.

City Hall
Ray Hollister / WJCT News

Jacksonville voters are a step closer to deciding whether to extend a sales tax for the sake of reducing pension debt.

At the request of Mayor Lenny Curry, City Council President Greg Anderson has filed a bill that would put the question on the August 30 primary ballot.


We broadcast live from the fifth annual Generation W women's leadership conference. 

Media Roundtable Week in Review

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Mark Woods, Florida Times-Union columnist; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly editor; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; and WJCT News analayst John Burr.

Topics include Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry's push to have voters decide whether to approve a half-cent sales tax to help pay off the city's pension debt, this week's One Spark event, and more.

We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Dan Scanlan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly editor; and John Burr, WJCT news analyst.

Topics include President Barack Obama visiting the First Coast this week, the 2016 presidential race, and more.


Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

The Jacksonville City Council is delaying its decision on a settlement between the Police and Fire Pension Board, its former executive director and the city.

The Council plans to have a meeting in the shade to talk strategy.

  We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Mark Woods, Florida Times-Union columnist; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly editor; and WJCT news analyst John Burr.

Topics include this week's community conversation hosted by Jacksonville Mayor Lenny and Sheriff Mike Williams about youth violence and public safety, the new investigation into the sinking of the cargo ship El Faro, and more.


We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Paula Horvath, Florida Times-Union columnist; Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include the CBS News investigation into the Wounded Warrior Project's spending, a new proposed constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana in the state, and more.


It's a national coalition that first formed in 2010 as a response to the Supreme Court's Cititzens United decision establishing corporate personhood.

Move to Amend is a grassroots effort with the message that money is not speech.

So far the coalition has succeeded in passing resolutions in 16 states calling for a constitutional amendment to overturn the effect of Citizens United.

David Cobb, Outreach Director for Move to Amend, will be speaking at UNF Monday night. He joins us to discuss the group's efforts.


We discuss the week's top news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Larry Hannan, Florida Times-Union reporter; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; Claire Goforth, Folio Weekly writer; and Tim Gibbons, Jacksonville Business Journal editor.

Topics include the federal subpoena served to Rep. Corrine Brown (D-FL5) this week, Public Defender Matt Shirk seeking a third term in office, and more.

After a 14 to 4 vote, the Jacksonville City Council passed a long-awaited deal on pension reform Tuesday night. The agreement would change new and current employees’ pension benefits, as well as how the pension fund is governed. The city has also made a commitment to pay and additional $350 million toward the pension’s debt over the next 13 years. We speak with two reporters who covered the meeting, the Florida Times-Union's David Bauerlein, and Florida Politics and Folio Weekly's A.G. Gancarski.

Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT News

A judge has sided with the city of Jacksonville in a legal challenge to City Council’s pension negotiations. A local watchdog group had asked Duval Circuit Judge Thomas Beverly  to block an upcoming City Council vote on a new Police and Fire Pension reform bill, but the group’s motion was denied.

Pages