podcast

Woodbine, Georgia At The Center Of A New Podcast

Apr 19, 2021
Courtesy Pineapple Street Media

A new podcast called “Stay Away From Matthew Magill” from production house Pineapple Street Media is set in the Jacksonville area and tells the story of a mysterious box left behind when a strange man dies in the small town of Woodbine, Georgia. 

Allman Brothers' Jacksonville Days: Jumping Creeks And Partying In Riverside

Aug 28, 2020
sign in front of two-story gray house
Lindsey Kilbride / WJCT

The Allman Brothers Band was one of the most critically admired and commercially successful rock groups of the 1970s and beyond. Although many of the band’s best songs were created in Jacksonville, VOIDCAST host Matt Shaw argues the band is wildly underappreciated locally. 

As politicians and pastors speak out about violent crime in Jacksonville, mourners laid to rest the 13th homicide victim of the year Saturday.

22-month-old Aiden Michael McClendon was shot by a stray bullet January 29 as he sat inside a parked car. Police are investigating the possibly gang-related shooting.

Jacksonville has been Florida’s murder capital on and off for more than a decade now. As Mayor Lenny Curry works to reinvigorate the Jacksonville Journey anti-crime initiative, we examine the city's murder rate and root causes of crime in Jacksonville. Dr. Michael Hallet, professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of North Florida, joins us.


Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry announced in a memo last week that he is changing city employment policy to prohibit discrimination of any kind.

Curry also said that he does not support any further anti-discrimination legislation, including the two competing human rights ordinance bills currently before the Jacksonville City Council. 

One of them, sponsored by Councilman Tommy Hazouri, would prohibit discrimination in housing, employment or public areas based sexual orientation, gender identity or expression by amending the city’s existing HRO.

The other bill before the Council, introduced by Councilman Bill Gulliford would let voters decide on those protections instead of the Council.

In Florida more than a dozen cities have adopted a human rights ordinance that includes non-discrimination protections for the LGBT community. However, Jacksonville remains the largest American city that has yet to do so.

We discuss the latest the two bills before City Council with Florida Politics writer A.G. Gancarski, who has been following the story.


The local activist group Families of Slain Children held a conference Monday about the ongoing issue of gun violence in Jacksonville following the shooting death of a 22-month-old boy on the city's Eastside.

There’s a $20,000 reward for information leading to the arrest in the murder of Aiden Michael McClendon.

We speak with Families of Slain Children founder and CEO Beverly McClain.


We discuss the week's biggest news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Paula Horvath, Florida Times-Union columnist; Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include the CBS News investigation into the Wounded Warrior Project's spending, a new proposed constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana in the state, and more.


A new book by a local author and professor looks at the understudied issue of colorism and its impact on young black women.

Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder's "Color Stories: Black Women and Colorism in the 21st Century" examines discrimination within the African-American community based on skin tone. Wilder is an associate professor of sociology and director of the new Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations at the University of North Florida.

We speak with Wilder about the history of colorism and its contemporary significance.


The Jacksonville City Council heard three hours of public comment Tuesday night on whether to update the city's human rights ordinance to cover LGBT citizens from discrimination.

City Councilmen Bill Gulliford and Tommy Hazouri are both sponsoring bills that could expand the city’s human rights ordinance to protect people in the areas of sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. The Council is expected to start deliberation on the bills soon.

We discuss the latest on Jacksonville's HRO with WJCT reporter Lindsey Kilbride.


Gov. Rick Scott is expected to sign a water policy bill Thursday, despite veto pleas from some environmentalists and former governor Bob Graham.

SB 552 is a priority of Speaker Steve Crisafulli, and was one of the first bills the Legislature passed this session. It changes water policy across Florida, from springs to water supply.

In addition to Graham, a coalition of 106 environmental and civic groups delivered a letter to the Legislature asking for significant changes to the bill. One of the groups opposing the measure is the Jacksonville-based St. Johns Riverkeeper.

We speak with St. Johns Riverkeeper Lisa Rinaman about the bill and her group's efforts to raise awareness about the river.


The results of a new poll released this week by the Florida Times-Union show Donald Trump and Ted Cruz leading the field of Republican presidential candidates among likely voters in Florida.

Trump is the choice of 31 percent of GOP primary voters in the state, a 12-point lead over Ted Cruz’s 19 percent support.

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Senator Marco Rubio are essentially tied for third place, with 13 percent and 12 percent, respectively.

We discuss the state of the presidential race with Matt Towery, founder of InsiderAdvantage, which conducted the poll.

Also joining us are Mike Binder, assistant professor of political science and public affairs at UNF, and Stephen Baker, professor of political science at Jacksonville University.


A raft of death penalty cases across the state of Florida are in limbo after a ruling last week by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court struck down Florida’s death penalty sentencing system, declaring that it violates defendants’ Sixth Amendment Rights to trial by jury. This means delays for the outcome of many cases, including several here in our area.

About 400 people currently sit on Florida’s Death Row, including the man charged with murdering Jacksonville resident Shelby Farah. Two years ago, defendant James Xavier Rhodes offered to plead guilty to the murder in exchange for life in prison without possibility of parole. Shelby’s mother, Darlene Farah, has urged the State Attorney’s Office to take the plea. However, State Attorney Angela Corey still intends to pursue the death penalty for Rhodes.

We discuss the latest in the case with Darlene Farah, and attorney and former prosecutor Dale Carson, co-counsel on the civil suit for the Farah family.

We also look at how the Supreme Court ruling affects the Florida death penalty as a whole with Ben Jones, campaign strategist for the criminal justice reform organization Equal Justice USA.


Fourth Circuit Public Defender Matt Shirk is seeking a third term.

Shirk has confirmed that he will run for re-election, and says he's trying to move past controversy that has dogged his time in office.

That includes a scathing grand jury report that recommended he resign after allegations he sent sexually suggestive text messages to employees, deleted public records and spent campaign funds on behalf of a family member.

He join us to discuss these and other issues.

 The economy and jobs are so strong as 2016 begins that the Federal Reserve recently raised interest rates for the first time in nearly a decade. However, paychecks and the stock market are still flat. We discuss what could be expected from economy in the new year with economists Andres Gallo, of the University of North Florida, and Dr. Hassan Pordeli, of Jacksonville University.


We discuss the top local news stories of 2015 with our roundtable of journalists: Dan Scanlan, Florida Times-Union reporter; Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include the Jacksonville mayoral election, the city's human rights ordinance, efforts to develop the Shipyards property in downtown, and more.


State Attorney Angela Corey joins us to discuss her reelection campaign as well as the concept of "smart justice" in the criminal justice system.


The Church of Eleven22, a popular Jacksonville church in the Intracoastal area, is one of the fastest growing congregations in the country, drawing young worshippers attracted to its positive message and dynamic pastor.

A recent investigation in Folio Weekly finds some former members raising concerns about the church. In particular, there are allegations that members are pressured to deny their sexual orientation after Eleven22 released a video earlier this year of a member discussing the church's impact on her homosexuality.

Church of Eleven22 Pastor Joseph "Joby" Martin III joins us with his thoughts.


As presidential candidates gather this week for the final GOP debate, we discuss at the latest in the 2016 race, as well as recent controversial comments about Muslim made by Donald Trump. UNF professors Matt Corrigan and Parvez Ahmed join us.


The Church of Eleven22, a popular Jacksonville church in the Intracoastal area, is one of the fastest growing congregations in the country, drawing young worshippers attracted to its positive message and dynamic pastor.

We discuss the week's top news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Paula Horvath, Florida Times-Union columnist; A.G. Gancarski, Florida Politics writer; Matt Shaw, Folio Weekly editor; and WJCT analyst John Burr.

Topics include Mayor Lenny Curry this week convening the second of three community conversations about the city's human rights ordinance, Congresswoman Corrine Brown vowing legal action over a new congressional map, and more.

We speak with retired County Judge Charles Cofer about his decision to run for the office of public defender. Current Public Defender Matt Shirk has yet to announce if he will run for a third term.


  The Jacksonville Public Education Fund released its annual public education perceptions poll this week.

The results found that most Duval County residents support a small increase in taxes to support public education.

We discuss the numbers with JPEF President Trey Csar.


Over the past 15 years, the global response to HIV/AIDS has vastly slowed the spread of the disease, averting more than 30 million new HIV infections and nearly eight million deaths since 2000.

New HIV infections are down 35 percent in the past 15 years, and AIDS-related deaths have fallen by more than 40 percent in about the same period. The discovery of antiretroviral treatments in the 1990s turned an HIV diagnosis from a death sentence into a chronic illness. But even though new HIV drugs can save lives, and halt the transmission of the virus, there remain big gaps in access to treatment.

Here in town, the local LGBT group JASMYN this week announced the new three-year AIDSFreeJax Campaign to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS, primarily among Northeast Florida youth who are at particular risk.

We speak with Cindy Watson, executive director of JASMYN, and First Coast physician Dr. Dori Russ.


Three years ago, Reverend R.L. Gundy of Mt. Sinai Baptist Church was a vocal opponent of updating Jacksonville’s anti-discrimination law to cover lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. 

But now, Gundy has changed his mind, saying it's time to "move the city forward." And he has joined a coalition of about 50 local faith leaders in support of updating the human rights ordinance.

We speak with Reverend R.L. Gundy about his change of position.


The U.S. Attorney’s Office in this region has accepted more than $30 million from several Jacksonville compounding pharmacies, to settle allegations they engaged in kickbacks and fraud while selling unnecessary drugs to active military personnel. Jason Mehta, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Florida, joins us with more.


A Russian warplane was allegedly shot down near Turkey's border with Syria Tuesday morning. Syria has been embroiled for four and a half years in a brutal civil war that has killed hundreds thousands of people, and sent millions of others fleeing.

The incident at the border with Turkey comes as the nation continues its heated debate about the resettlement of Syrian refugees.

This week, Florida Coastal School of Law will host a panel discussion on the crisis and the legal issues around refugee resettlement. We speak with Ericka Curran, immigration attorney and Clinic Director with the school, and Florida Coastal law student Elizabeth Lazar. Her family, Assryian Christians from Iraq, fled persecution there decades ago. 


November 23 marks the third anniversary of the shooting of Jacksonville teen Jordan Davis. Davis was killed on Black Friday, 2012, after a gas station altercation with Michael Dunn over loud music.

Davis was an African-American teen. Dunn, who is white, is currently serving a life sentence in the killing. However, he controversially was tried twice for the murder, with a jury deadlocking on a first-degree murder charge the first time around.

HBO is marking the anniversary tonight as the cable channel debuts the new documentary "3 ½ Minutes, 10 Bullets," which details Davis' death and Dunn's trials.

Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder, UNF race expert and  associate professor of sociology, joins us to discuss the impact these events had on the national conversation surrounding race and justice.

We discuss the week's top news stories with our roundtable of local journalists: Ron Littlepage, Florida-Times Union columnist; Fred Matthews, Examiner blogger; Matt Shaw, Folio Weekly editor; and Tim Gibbons, Jacksonville Business Journal editor.

Topics include Mayor Lenny Curry and Gov. Rick Scott asking Congress to stop plans to accept Syrian refugees following the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, the first of several community conversations about whether Jacksonville should expand anti-discrimiation laws to cover LGBT citizens, and more.


What started as protests over offensive Halloween costumes and racial insensitivity at Yale and the University of Missouri has spread to colleges and universities nationwide with thousands of student-protesters across the country demanding an end to what they see as systematic racism on campus. That includes an incident in Jacksonville, where students last week found a noose on the UNF campus.

At the University of Missouri, a student’s hunger strike over racism, and an unprecedented football team boycott of future games, led to President Tim Wolfe’s resignation. Protesters have succeeded in ousting administrators at other campuses too.

We speak with Jacksonville resident Howard Taylor, a Mizzou graduate and former roommate of Michael Middleton, the newly named interim president of the University. The two of them were part of the group that formed the Legion of Black Collegians at the school and Taylor was the first African American member of the Student Union at Missouri.

  Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry has joined Gov. Rick Scott and other governors around the country who’ve said they do not want refugees from Syria in their states. In a letter Tuesday, Curry asked Jacksonville’s congressional delegation to stop a plan to accept Syrian refugees.

Jacksonville has the fifth largest Syrian population in America, and one of the largest Arab-American populations overall.

The terrorist attacks in Paris have raised concerns about refugee resettlements from the region. The leaders of World Relief Jacksonville, which works to resettle refugees from all over the world, say those concerns are misplaced.

We speak with Michelle Clowe, Refugee Services Coordinator, Travis Trice, Church Mobilizer, and Katie Sullivan, Volunteer Coordinator with World Relief Jacksonville.

 A potentially historic U.N. summit on climate change later this month in Paris, expected to draw President Barack Obama and other world leaders, will be scaled back due to security concerns following Friday's terror attacks that left 129 people dead across the French capital.

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls reportedly told local radio Monday morning that the conference will be "reduced to the negotiation" between countries' representatives, adding that "a lot of concerts and festivities will be canceled."

We discuss what could be expected out of the conference with Josh Gellers, assistant professor at UNF and research fellow at The Earth System Governance Project, the largest network of social scientists working on governance and global environmental change issues.


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