Typhoon Haiyan

As feared, the number of confirmed deaths in the Philippines from Typhoon Haiyan continues to rise as authorities search through destroyed buildings and as they reach remote areas that were devastated when the storm blew through on Nov. 8.

Alvin Brown, Rayne Perrywinkle, and Rick Scott are in the headlines today.

A little over a week after a major typhoon devastated parts of the Philippines, there is some reason for hope today.

NPR's Russell Lewis, who has been trying to get to Tacloban all week, points us to the front page of today's The Philippine Star: "Aid Delivery To Leyte, Samar Speeding Up" the main headline reads.

NOAA

Members of Jacksonville’s Filipino community are continuing relief efforts following last week's devastating typhoon with a fundraising event tonight.

It was one week ago today that Typhoon Haiyan swept across the Philippines, flattening buildings and killing more than 3,000 people. Most who survived the storm found themselves without food, water, or shelter.

Rosabel Hill with the organization We Filipino, Inc. says there has been an outpouring of concern by residents of the First Coast.

Emergency aid, including stocks of food, started arriving this week in cyclone-devastated areas of the Philippines; more is on the way.

The first wave of aid — high-energy biscuits designed to keep people alive when food is scarce — arrived via airlift. Huge shiploads of rice will be needed in the weeks and months to come. And exactly how the U.S. donates of that rice is a flashpoint in a long-running debate in Washington, D.C., about food aid.

EverBank Field, One Spark, and cold weather are in the headlines today.