Union of Concerned Scientists

Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Hector Cortes, from Puerto Rico, prepares heaving lines on Aug. 29, 2019, at Naval Station Mayport in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.
Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nathan T. Beard / U.S. Navy

Jacksonville’s Naval Station Mayport is among the many military bases that will have to deal with significantly hotter days, according to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. Mayport has historically seen eight days a year with heat index values over 100 degrees. By 2050, that number is projected to jump to 74 days.

Senior Airman Damon Kasberg / U.S. Air Force

Florida’s heat set record highs last month. The Union of Concerned Scientists says in less than 20 years, Florida will be so hot for so much of the year that it could literally be life threatening. The scientists in a new report say the world must reduce carbon emissions now or face extreme heat that will take lives within decades. 

An airman assigned to the 557th Expeditionary RED HORSE drinks water while working on a construction site.
Senior Airman Damon Kasberg / U.S. Air Force

In the days after Hurricane Irma tore up the center of Florida in September 2017, 14 residents at a South Florida nursing home died after the facility lost power to its air-conditioning system.

Wikimedia Commons

A new report estimates $351 billion worth of Florida homes will be at risk from tidal flooding by the end of the century, including a significant portion in First Coast coastal communities.

Ryan Benk / WJCT News

Natural gas took center stage at the Florida Energy Summit in Jacksonville Thursday, sponsored by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and hosted by the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce. 

Energy company execs and government officials called the fuel source integral to the state’s energy independence.

But a recent study says Florida and the rest of the country are too reliant on the fuel.


Intergalacticz9 / WIkimedia Commons

A new report is sounding the alarm again about climate change and how it could impact the Sunshine State.