Kerry Sheridan

Kerry Sheridan is a reporter and co-host of All Things Considered at WUSF Public Media.

Prior to joining WUSF, she covered international news, health, science, space and environmental issues for Agence France-Presse from 2005 to 2019, reporting from the Middle East bureau in Cyprus, followed by stints in Washington and Miami.

Kerry earned her master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 2002, and was a recipient of the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship for Cultural Reporting.

She got her start in radio news as a freelancer with WFUV in the Bronx in 2002. Since then, her stories have spanned a range of topics, including politics, baseball, rocket launches, art exhibits, coral reef restoration, life-saving medical research, and more.

She is a native of upstate New York, and currently lives with her husband and two children in Sarasota.

You can reach Kerry via email at sheridank@wusf.org, on Twitter @kerrsheridan or by phone at 813-974-8663.

Hillsborough County was part of a recent nationwide effort to improve schools from the top down, through a project known as the "principal pipeline."

Sad songs. Why do we love them so much? And might they be bad for us? Especially for people with clinical depression?

Psychology researchers at the University of South Florida studied this question, and uncovered some surprising results.

An NPR poll this week found that most parents want their children to learn about climate change at school, but that many teachers don't discuss it because they think it's beyond their subject matter or expertise.

Elementary schools that immerse children in a foreign language are on the rise across the country. At a new French immersion school in St. Petersburg, which opened in September, American kids as young as three are learning French by speaking it all day.

Chalk artists from around the world are coloring the walls and streets of downtown Sarasota this weekend with vivid imagery, classical style artwork and optical illusions.

The Broadway musical "Hamilton" won critical acclaim with its modern take on historical figures. As the show makes its way across the United States, students in select cities are getting a chance to learn about the Founding Fathers and perform their own original pieces in the style of Hamilton.

Two ships that are replicas of Christopher Columbus’s historic sailing vessels, the Pinta and the Niña, have docked in Palmetto for a week-long stop.

Research shows that four in five school shooters tell someone about their plans ahead of time. One father who lost his son at Sandy Hook Elementary visited a St. Petersburg high school on Thursday to teach students how to recognize and report the warning signs.

Hurricane season may be about three months away, but the city of Tampa already has a plan to help residents after a storm.

Local law enforcement in five parts of Florida have reached agreements to work with federal agents by detaining suspected criminals longer if they are in the country illegally.

People who fish for sharks in Florida will soon have to get a special permit. State wildlife officials are also banning chumming from shore, which involves dropping fish parts and blood into the water to attract sharks.

The mayor of Port Richey faces two counts of attempted murder after firing shots at police outside his home early Thursday. Police say Dale Massad, 68, shot a handgun, injuring no one, before he was taken into custody.

Eleven people have applied so far to become the next president of the University of South Florida, a spokesman said Wednesday.

A plan to boost teacher pay at 50 struggling schools was approved Tuesday by the Hillsborough County School Board.

Hundreds of educators could earn up to $13,000 more per year as part of the plan, which aims to ease an ongoing teacher shortage.

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