Ryan Dailey

Ryan Dailey is a reporter/producer for WFSU/Florida Public Radio. After graduating from Florida State University, Ryan went into print journalism working for the Tallahassee Democrat for five years. At the Democrat, he worked as a copy editor, general assignment and K-12 education reporter.

Born in Nashua, New Hampshire, Ryan also lived in Lawrenceville, Georgia and Southwest Florida before moving to Tallahassee. On a day off, you might find him playing guitar, attempting to play golf or hanging out with his dog, Buddy.

A provision in the Senate’s big criminal justice reform bill could make a big impact early on, if signed into law. That impact would come in the form of fewer people incarcerated, and significant savings for the state.

Hurricane Michael devastated Florida’s Panhandle in October as the most powerful storm ever to make landfall in the region. The storm has been reclassified by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as a category 5.

Residents of Panama City and other areas of the Florida Panhandle that got walloped by Hurricane Michael came to legislators’ doorstep to make some noise Tuesday. Half a year after the storm, the area is desperate for funding to help schools, remove debris and fund housing.

Two big criminal justice reform bills are moving through the Florida Legislature. Backers of the similar bills in both chambers are going through negotiations down the stretch to position a final measure for passage.

Thursday marked the 50th anniversary of the Florida Commission on Human Relations, which was created by the legislature to prevent discrimination in things like housing and employment. Ryan Dailey spoke with Representative Geraldine Thompson, who prior to being a legislator served on and at one time chaired the Commission.

It was a vote heard ‘round the legislature this week, when the Senate Minority Leader voted down on a bill looking to add protections from anti-Semitism discrimination in public schools. Senator Audrey Gibson is now walking back comments made in committee.

A Florida House bill that looks to crack down on human trafficking may be getting some changes before its next committee stop. Representative Heather Fitzenhagen’s bill passed the House Appropriations Committee Tuesday.

New Agency for Health Care Administration secretary Mary Mayhew got her second positive vote of confirmation from a Senate committee Monday. Mayhew faced more tough lines of questioning from Health Policy committee members, but won over one key Democratic vote.

Governor Ron DeSantis’ pick to head the Agency for Health Care Administration, Mary Mayhew, passed her first Senate confirmation hearing Thursday. Mayhew briefly oversaw Medicaid for the Trump administration, and was over the program in Maine for seven years prior. Some Senators grilled Mayhew on her noted opposition to Medicaid expansion.

The Senate Education Committee has advanced a bill to explore what it calls “intellectual freedom” on college campuses, drawing the most debate of any item at its meeting. Other measures had an easier time being pushed through the committee Tuesday.

A year out from the 2020 U.S. Census, some Florida Democratic lawmakers are calling for a question concerning citizenship to be scrubbed from the census form. And one bill waiting for a committee hearing looks to push for an accurate count.

A measure moving through Florida’s House and Senate looks to add student immunization records to the Department of Health’s existing database. Amendments to the bill would let parents opt out of being listed on the registry, but critics are still skeptical on whether their privacy is protected.

A committee bill in the Florida house looking to make sweeping changes to the state’s election laws has cleared a key committee stop. A number of them would modify the state’s vote-by-mail procedure, which sparked a partisan debate about voter access.

The Florida League of Mayors brought municipality heads to the Capitol Wednesday to oppose preemption bills this legislative session. The group of about 30 mayors also met with Attorney General Ashley Moody to discuss Florida’s mental health system.

A bill to replicate Miami’s needle exchange program statewide is inching closer to passing the Florida Legislature. It cleared its first committee hurdle Tuesday in the House.

Pages